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LG puts OLED in airplane cabins, installs rollable TV in the ceiling

LG puts OLED in airplane cabin...
LG Display's vision for the aircraft cabin of the future includes an OLED wall and transparent partitions
LG Display's vision for the aircraft cabin of the future includes an OLED wall and transparent partitions
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LG Display will preview an OLED dashboard at CES 2020, comprising four screens housed under a single sheet of glass
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LG Display will preview an OLED dashboard at CES 2020, comprising four screens housed under a single sheet of glass
LG Display's vision for the aircraft cabin of the future includes an OLED wall and transparent partitions
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LG Display's vision for the aircraft cabin of the future includes an OLED wall and transparent partitions
The rollable TV concept (shown) has been tweaked for CES 2020 so that users can pull the TV down from the ceiling
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The rollable TV concept (shown) has been tweaked for CES 2020 so that users can pull the TV down from the ceiling

CES 2020 is just around the corner, and LG Display is revealing OLED screens for airplanes, cars, hotels and living rooms – including a version of its impressive rollable television that is hidden in the ceiling and pulled down like a projector screen.

Back in 2018, LG Display unveiled an ultra-thin OLED display that could be pulled out of a box, rolling out to offer viewers 65 diagonal inches of 4K visual goodness. And then hidden from view in its base unit when not in use. It could also be partially unfurled so that notifications, alerts and calendar or weather updates were showing.

Where that concept would still take up valuable floorspace, the latest iteration will be stowed away in the ceiling and pulled down when the family gathers to watch a favorite show, and then rolled back up between uses. Unfortunately, LG Display hasn't shared any images of this new prototype yet, but if you imagine the rollable TV shown below turned on its head with the box hidden in the ceiling cavity, you'll get some idea of what to expect.

The rollable TV concept (shown) has been tweaked for CES 2020 so that users can pull the TV down from the ceiling
The rollable TV concept (shown) has been tweaked for CES 2020 so that users can pull the TV down from the ceiling

Also on show at the company's CES booth will be a video wall made up of 55-inch OLED displays crammed into the window side of an airplane's interior. The idea is to give passengers the feeling of more space inside the cabin, but airlines will likely be quick to use the technology to feed a captive audience with colorful advertisements.

First Class passengers could also enjoy a more immersive inflight movie experience by curving in the ends of the UHD OLED screens that LG Display will be taking to Las Vegas next week. Flight information could be served on transparent OLED aisle partitions, too.

LG Display will preview an OLED dashboard at CES 2020, comprising four screens housed under a single sheet of glass
LG Display will preview an OLED dashboard at CES 2020, comprising four screens housed under a single sheet of glass

Elsewhere, a dashboard made up of four Plastic OLED displays – a 14-inch instrument cluster, a 12.3-inch info display, a 12.3-inch "Co-Driver Display" and a 12.8-inch central fascia – will be presented under a single sheet of glass, and the rollable theme continues with a 12.8-inch OLED concept designed for passenger entertainment.

The latest 77-inch "wafer-thin" TV designed for hanging on a wall like wallpaper and 88-inch 8K OLED display with 11.2-channel sound system are also due to make an appearance. CES 2020 opens its doors to the public on January 7.

Source: LG Display

4 comments
paul314
If you're going to put OLED on the wall, does that mean you can get rid of the windows?
Signguy
paul314: I kinda like the idea; a"window" using an app that gives you a view without unwanted cars or buildings, etc.
Douglas Rogers
TV's are already cheaper than windows, especially when heating and cooling are included. Only good from the camera viewing angle.
aksdad
Now if they could get 50-inch-plus OLED displays to be cost-competitive with LCD panels, or even only twice as expensive as an LCD, that would be something we could get excited about.