Architecture

Koda concrete micro-home now available for purchase in the UK

Koda concrete micro-home now a...
Kodasema is currently researching affordable housing ideas for London
Kodasema is currently researching affordable housing ideas for London
View 17 Images
The Koda is built from concrete and ships in prefabricated sections, so can be assembled within a working day
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The Koda is built from concrete and ships in prefabricated sections, so can be assembled within a working day
As well as a house, the Koda can be used as a small café, office, workshop/studio, or classroom
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As well as a house, the Koda can be used as a small café, office, workshop/studio, or classroom
Inside the Koda's bathroom
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Inside the Koda's bathroom
Kodasema is currently researching affordable housing ideas for London
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Kodasema is currently researching affordable housing ideas for London
The Koda has a total floorspace of 26.4 sq m (284 sq ft)
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The Koda has a total floorspace of 26.4 sq m (284 sq ft)
Inside the Koda's bedroom
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Inside the Koda's bedroom
The Koda is built from concrete and ships in prefabricated sections, so can be assembled very quickly
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The Koda is built from concrete and ships in prefabricated sections, so can be assembled very quickly
The Koda needs no foundations – just a level surface
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The Koda needs no foundations – just a level surface
The Koda is lit by LED lighting
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The Koda is lit by LED lighting
Inside the Koda
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Inside the Koda
With all the bells and whistles, you're probably looking at spending up to £150,000 (US$194,000) for the Koda
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With all the bells and whistles, you're probably looking at spending up to £150,000 (US$194,000) for the Koda
The Koda units installed in an Estonian school 
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The Koda units installed in an Estonian school 
The Koda units installed in an Estonian school 
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The Koda units installed in an Estonian school 
The Koda can be installed in around seven hours 
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The Koda can be installed in around seven hours 
A Koda show home is currently installed in the UK’s BRE Innovation Park
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A Koda show home is currently installed in the UK’s BRE Innovation Park
The interior finish of the Koda looks to a high standard
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The interior finish of the Koda looks to a high standard
The Koda is built from concrete and ships in prefabricated sections
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The Koda is built from concrete and ships in prefabricated sections
View gallery - 17 images

The Koda is an interesting micro-home that boasts a very small footprint, quick assembly, and an attractive modern style. Estonian creator Kodasema has now officially launched it in the UK for a starting price of £100,000 (roughly US$130,000) and has big plans in store for the tiny dwelling.

For those unfamiliar with the Koda, it's built from concrete and ships in prefabricated sections, so can be assembled, and for that matter dismantled, very quickly – or within a working day, to be precise. No foundations are required so all you'd need to get started is a suitable surface like gravel, or asphalt (not to mention a patch of land to put it on).

Inside the two-story home, there's a total floorspace of 26.4 sq m (284 sq ft), which is split between a living room, kitchen, bathroom with toilet and bath/shower, and a bedroom and laundry room upstairs. It looks pretty roomy and there are some nice high-end goodies available too, including solar power, digital door lock, and programmable LED lighting, which can bump up the starting price.

Indeed, with all the bells and whistles, you could end up spending up to £150,000 ($194,000) for a Koda home.

Inside the Koda
Inside the Koda

A Koda show home is installed in the UK's BRE Innovation Park and those interested can go and check it out in person. If purchased, delivery time is promised to be speedy once all the paperwork has been sorted.

Kodasema also offers the Koda in café, office, workshop/studio, store, and classroom configurations, each with different interior layouts and prices. It's being used in Estonia as rental apartments and complementary classrooms (pictured below), while a residence will be installed in August.

The Koda units installed in an Estonian school 
The Koda units installed in an Estonian school 

A new stackable version of the Koda is planned for 2018 and other future plans include a small "village" of seven Koda units to be installed in Tallinn in August. In addition, the firm is currently researching affordable housing ideas for London. More details on this will be available in Q3.

Source: Kodasema

View gallery - 17 images
7 comments
Maximilian
The price of these is absurd - prefabrication should make them cheaper, not more expensive. £100k for 284 sqft is about twice the cost of just getting a local builder to make a small house using conventional methods.
KaiserPingo
Asolutely love it ! Two of these, with the one made into a garage/workplace and I have all I want ! Would extend the top-beedroom area and apply a window, and change the stairs to be able to fold away, so you can have an undisturbed livingroom floor area and be left in peace in the bedroom. Prizes are insane, so would build one myself, with some more windows and an angled roof and with roof overhang (Nordic climate ! Otherwise there will be moist problems/heavy ice and snow and ugly striping down the sides).
jerryd
Nice but too pricey. I'll be happy to build them for $100k US. When stacking them sideways or on top of each other they should never be next to each other by the same width apart, then putting roof, floor, front, rear getting double the space at 20% more cost. With more floors the roof of the one below becomes the floor above only needing end walls to double room. Good way to do a loft with short stairs, less wasted space and easier to go pee in the middle of the night.
Bill S.
Just like everything else that is "European" (cars, food, housing, taxes) this thing is totally overpriced. Same square footage as a room on a cruise ship. For $130K you could buy an overpriced Airstream trailer brand new and it already has all the "bells and whistles". The thing is ugly too.
Sieg
The Price!!!!!!!!!!!!! has nothing to do with Europ as you can buy many prefabricated houses with a bigger floorspace, and not in concrete, for less>
Tom Lee Mullins
While I think this is a neat minimalist design, the price for one seem really high for what one gets.
Nik
Like almost all the other comments here, the price is crazy. Concrete is a poor material for this, as there are wood based insulated panels available which would give superior insulation, and would be less likely to suffer from frost damage, or ground movement, like concrete, and would be much lighter. Concrete clad buildings have a poor history in the UK, as they absorb moisture [water vapour] from inside, and out, which results in interstitial condensation, and eventually saturation. This then provides the ideal conditions for black mould. Some high rise buildings built in the 60's suffered from this, and it was cheaper to demolish the whole building, and rebuild, rather than try to cure the damp problem.