Laptops

Pi-based laptop has a learning lab hidden inside

Pi-based laptop has a learning...
The CrowPi2 is currently raising production funds on Kickstarter
The CrowPi2 is currently raising production funds on Kickstarter
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The CrowPi2 is currently raising production funds on Kickstarter
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The CrowPi2 is currently raising production funds on Kickstarter
2018's learning lab in a briefcase, the CrowPi
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2018's learning lab in a briefcase, the CrowPi
The wireless keyboard can be popped out to reveal a STEAM learning lab below
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The wireless keyboard can be popped out to reveal a STEAM learning lab below
Over 70 lessons on coding and programming are available out of the box, along with more than 30 projects and games
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Over 70 lessons on coding and programming are available out of the box, along with more than 30 projects and games
The CrowPi2 was built around the Raspberry Pi 4 development board, but also supports earlier versions
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The CrowPi2 was built around the Raspberry Pi 4 development board, but also supports earlier versions
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Developer of open source hardware and education products Elecrow has launched a Kickstarter to fund production of a chunky Raspberry Pi-based laptop with a STEAM learning lab hidden underneath the removable keyboard.

STEAM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics, and is a goal-oriented learning system that encourages independent thinking, develops real-world problem solving skills and promotes teamwork. The 291 x 190 x 46-mm (11.4 x 7.5 x 1.8-in), 1.3-kg (2.8-lb) CrowPi2 can serve as a portable STEAM project lab or a functioning laptop, or both.

An updated version of Elecrow's CrowPi learning lab in a briefcase from 2018, the CrowPi2's QWERTY keyboard can be popped out of the frame and used as a wireless input device for the 11.6-inch 1,920 x 1,080 resolution IPS display. Doing so reveals a project board that's home to 22 sensors, a thumb joystick, an exposed GPIO header from the Pi beneath, a small breadboard, LCD display, RGB LED matrix and more to experiment with hardware electronics and programming.

The wireless keyboard can be popped out to reveal a STEAM learning lab below
The wireless keyboard can be popped out to reveal a STEAM learning lab below

The idea is to make learning fun and engaging, and over 70 step-by-step lessons on Scratch, Python, AI, and Minecraft are included, along with more than 30 projects and games.

There's a 2-MP webcam and microphone in the center of the top bezel, stereo speakers and a 3.5-mm headphone jack, a wireless mouse is included for those who don't want to use the keyboard's trackpad, and there's space for installing storage, power bank or other components. A stepper motor, mini fan, RFID card and tag, IR remote and more are also supplied to enhance the learning experience.

Kickstarter pledges for those who already have a Pi 4B, 3B+ or 3B lying around start at HKD1,310 (about US$170). A kit including a Pi 4 already installed, two game controllers, programming books and more bumps that up to HKD1,853. If all goes to plan, shipping is estimated to start in August.

Source: Elecrow

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2 comments
FB36
Home computers, like C64 & ZX Spectrum & TRS-80 etc, had made learning programming really fun (back in the 80s & 90s)! I had never seen any computer for today's kids, which I thought could really top those old home computers! Maybe this is it/first?
Karmudjun
This is much more mainstream than Elecrow's first clunky crow-pi lunchbox versions. I have one competitor (pi-top) which came with RPi2 that I upgraded to RPi3 before the system lost it's battery pack. It started my boys on more than keyboard & screen computing! Elecrow has really upped the ante compared to pi-top. I will be able to teach my boys about more than games & internet surfing! My older son has started coding in python (a python game that he wanted to modify - a lot of trial and error but it is learning!) and we are building IoT with Arduino so I'll look into this RPi4B laptop/STEM lab....it looks spectacular! A little shout out to FB36 - I started in the late 70's and early 80's when everything was cost prohibitive & moving from analog to digital. The digital systems were not really robust in those days, I didn't get analog so much and I slipped into electronics & machine language study before moving to medicine.......more lucrative for me. But you are right. While the C64 was popular, I am familiar with the 8-bit Z80 and it's later version, the Z280 that took hobby computing from 8 bit to 16 bit computing. Digital was so unforgiving in those days - but when you got it right, it was an achievement! I want my boys to get their version of that excitement, that "nerd" mastery.