Bicycles

Together at last? Bike lights and a cable lock

The Lemurlock combines a cable lock with a headlight and tail light
The Lemurlock combines a cable lock with a headlight and tail light
View 3 Images
Both Lemurlock lights are water-resistant and are electrically-linked by the cable, with one charge of the single lithium-ion battery being good for seven hours in steady mode or 14 when blinking
1/3
Both Lemurlock lights are water-resistant and are electrically-linked by the cable, with one charge of the single lithium-ion battery being good for seven hours in steady mode or 14 when blinking
The Lemurlock combines a cable lock with a headlight and tail light
2/3
The Lemurlock combines a cable lock with a headlight and tail light
When it's time to lock up, the Lemurlock's lights come off, and a sliding steel barrel lock on the cable is used to secure it around an adjacent immovable object such as a lamp post or railing
3/3
When it's time to lock up, the Lemurlock's lights come off, and a sliding steel barrel lock on the cable is used to secure it around an adjacent immovable object such as a lamp post or railing

Unless you use lights that are semi-permanently attached to your bike, you generally have to bring them inside with you when leaving your bike parked. Don't want to bother? Well, that's where Lemurlock comes in. It combines a headlight and tail light with a 6-foot (1.8-m) coiled steel cable lock.

The two lights are permanently attached to either end of the 9-mm-thick cable, and sit on quick-release mounts on the handlebar and seatpost when the bike is in motion. When it's time to lock up, they come off, and a sliding steel barrel lock on the cable is used to secure it around an adjacent immovable object such as a lamp post or railing. It's demonstrated in the video at the bottom of the page.

When it's time to lock up, the Lemurlock's lights come off, and a sliding steel barrel lock on the cable is used to secure it around an adjacent immovable object such as a lamp post or railing
When it's time to lock up, the Lemurlock's lights come off, and a sliding steel barrel lock on the cable is used to secure it around an adjacent immovable object such as a lamp post or railing

Both lights are IPX6 water-resistant (they stand up to heavy splashing and rain) and are electrically-linked by the cable, with one charge of the single lithium-ion battery being good for seven hours in steady mode or 14 when blinking. The headlight kicks out 200 lumens, while the tail light is rated at 30.

Admittedly, the setup does look like it could be somewhat obtrusive when pedalling. According to inventor Todd Holbrook, however, that isn't a problem. "A lot of people already store their cable lock on the top tube as they're riding, and it coils pretty tight," he tells us. "In the case of Lemurlock, it sticks even tighter to the tube since it's stretched front to back. One of our final revisions will also cut down a lot of the bulkiness of the cable as well."

If you're interested in getting a Lemurlock of your own, it's currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign. A pledge of US$49 will do the job, when and if it reaches production.

Sources: Lemurlock, Kickstarter

Lemurlock Lockable Bike Lights

3 comments
DaveWesely
When are we going to get off of this kick of removable bike lights? The lights should be permanent part of the bike just like the brake levers and derailleurs. I purchased a helmet light (SE3AAhdlt-bxa), spliced an extension wire between the head and tail light and attached it to the bike with zip ties and glue. Cheap, bright and theft-free.
LeemanMarkee
How is there still anybody who thinks that it's OK to use a cable lock?? Please, please nobody repost or support this product. Bikes with cable locks are being stolen every minute of every day.
Bob Flint
So if you can't bring your bike inside, how do you recharge the lights, and keep you bike locked with out a safe storage or second locking sytem?