Marine

Flexible houseboat sets sail for an affordable life on the water

Zhivov is hoping to bring the Modul Go to market for €100,000 (around US$124,500)
Zhivov is hoping to bring the Modul Go to market for €100,000 (around US$124,500)
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Modul Go would be made available in multiple iterations
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Modul Go would be made available in multiple iterations
Modul Go would feature an optional raised roof area with sleeping loft
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Modul Go would feature an optional raised roof area with sleeping loft
Zhivov is hoping to bring the Modul Go to market for €100,000 (around US$124,500)
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Zhivov is hoping to bring the Modul Go to market for €100,000 (around US$124,500)
Modul Go would be propelled with electric motors 
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Modul Go would be propelled with electric motors 
Modul Go would be available in multiple versions and colors 
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Modul Go would be available in multiple versions and colors 
Modul Go would feature an optional raised roof section with loft bedroom
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Modul Go would feature an optional raised roof section with loft bedroom
Like HydroHouse, Modul Go is envisioned as a dock for seaplanes 
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Like HydroHouse, Modul Go is envisioned as a dock for seaplanes 
Customers would order Modul Go with a smartphone app 
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Customers would order Modul Go with a smartphone app 
Inside Modul Go 
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Inside Modul Go 
It's still early days in the project, but Zhivov is hoping to find investors to bring it to market
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It's still early days in the project, but Zhivov is hoping to find investors to bring it to market

Designer Max Zhivov recently unveiled his latest project, the Modul Go. It's envisioned as an inexpensive and flexible motorized houseboat that could serve as a residence, coffee shop, or even be grouped together with other units to form a small floating community. As of writing it's still in the design stage, but Zhivov hopes to eventually bring it to market.

The Modul Go would be placed atop a floating platform measuring either 9 x 4.5 m or 13 x 6.5 m (29.5 x 14.7 ft or 42 x 21 ft) and propelled with electric motors. A roof-based solar array would provide some electricity and a water purification system would also be installed, but we've no finer details on this yet.

The interior would include a living area, dining area, kitchenette, bedroom and a bathroom with shower. There would be lots of options available, including layout, window placement, and color. In addition, an optional taller roof section would add a loft bedroom.

Inside Modul Go 
Inside Modul Go 

If it comes to market, customers would use an app on a smartphone or tablet to select whether they need a floating coffee store, cargo transportation model, or home, for example, before choosing additional options. The unit chosen would then be prefabricated in a factory and delivered in parts using trucks, taking a team of four people 48 hours to assemble when on site.

Zhivov told us that he's hoping to find investors to help move the project along. Should all go well, he expects the Modul Go to cost around €100,000 (approximately US$124,500). This is still a good chunk of change, but compares favorably with other models we've covered like the Bluefield Houseboat and UFO 2.0, which cost $200,000 and more.

Source: Max Zhivov

3 comments
ljaques
I like it. It has that nouveau carport look which somehow works for the interior. Keep your '50s check fabric couches, thanks, and drop the price in half if you want them to sell. I 'd also like to see propulsion specs, solar config, toilet/shower specs, so keep movin' along, folks.
Nik
Looks like a fun holiday camper, as long as the water is calm! The first question that came to me was, how and where do you dispose of toilet waste? The next was, who will pay that price for a floating trailer home? Then, cruising water holidays, tend to be peaceful and restful, why would anyone want to cram a load of them together, and destroy that? Its ''back to the drawing board,'' I think, to get the price down to a sensible level.
JohnStrickland
It's not bad, but totally impractical in the real world. Show me that nice pier. Where can I keep this trailer-on-the-water where people do not object? How are the electric motors charged (the solar will take a very long time), and nothing much is said about the fact that you need a barge to put it on. Sorry guys but it's fluff in the real world.
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