Motorcycles

MiClimate stops motorcyclists getting hot (or cold) under the collar

MiClimate stops motorcyclists ...
MiClimate is designed to keep motorcyclists cool in hot weather and warm in cold without risking their safety
MiClimate is designed to keep motorcyclists cool in hot weather and warm in cold without risking their safety
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The MiClimate is currently on Indiegogo, chasing a $20,000 goal
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The MiClimate is currently on Indiegogo, chasing a $20,000 goal
The MiClimate can be powered by a battery on your belt, or attached to a motorbike battery
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The MiClimate can be powered by a battery on your belt, or attached to a motorbike battery
MiClimate is controlled by a small bluetooth unit, which can be attached to your handlebars
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MiClimate is controlled by a small bluetooth unit, which can be attached to your handlebars
A quick explainer of how MiClimate works
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A quick explainer of how MiClimate works
MiClimate uses a low profile belt to deliver cool air to the inside of your jacket
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MiClimate uses a low profile belt to deliver cool air to the inside of your jacket
MiClimate draws in ambient air and cools or heats it using a thermo-electric system
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MiClimate draws in ambient air and cools or heats it using a thermo-electric system
The MiClimate can be had with or without an external battery
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The MiClimate can be had with or without an external battery
MiClimate is designed to keep motorcyclists cool in hot weather and warm in cold without risking their safety
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MiClimate is designed to keep motorcyclists cool in hot weather and warm in cold without risking their safety
View gallery - 8 images

Being exposed to the elements as they are, motorcycle riders face the prospect of sweating through hot days under their leathers, or shivering as frigid winds blow through them on cold ones. There are some heating and cooling options out there, as well as air-conditioning units designed specifically for motorbikes, but not everyone is keen to strap one of these to the back of their bike. Enter MiClimate, a belt designed to keep bikers at a comfortable temperature without adding too much bulk.

Built around an adjustable belt strap, the MiClimate system is made up of a lithium-ion battery, a core cooling unit and a Bluetooth remote that can be attached to the handlebars. To control the climate within the jacket, the core unit draws ambient air in and heats or cools it using a thermo-electric system. Once it's been conditioned the air is directed upwards through a flexible manifold, before a flexible internal structure releases it under the jacket.

MiClimate's 12-V, 72-Wh battery should offer up about four hours of comfort before it's time to recharge. If that won't cut it, the system can also be run off the motorbike battery. According to its creators, MiClimate is capable of cutting 18° F (10° C) from what's going on outside, or adding 36° F (20° C) to the ambient temperature.

As cool as this sounds, there are a few issues we can foresee with the MiClimate. For one, there's no guarantee the air will actually be able to circulate around the inside of a tight leather motorbike jacket, especially on a hot day when things tend to get a bit sticky and sweaty. We're also not sure about the holster-style mounting for the core unit, which could make people think you're packing heat of a different kind.

The MiClimate is currently listed on Indiegogo, where it has raised over US$7,500 of its $20,000 goal with one month remaining. Assuming everything goes to plan, pledging US$249 will get you a Base Kit, which doesn't include a battery, while $269 will get you a core unit and battery pack.

Source: MiClimate

View gallery - 8 images
4 comments
4 comments
xs400
The way I see it, there is a lot of waste heat available from the engine for an absorption/adsorption cooling unit, why not go this route? And of course heated air should be even simpler to channel into the suit.
toller
I like the idea. I use a wet vest when it is obnoxiously hot and have rigged a windshield washer pump to spritz a mist at me when haven't bothered with the vest. It only cools for a moment, but it is appreciated and I can push the button again. I'm not interested in wearing hard items around the waist which would create a presure point in a crash despite my wearing protective gear.
Bryan Paschke
only 18 degrees....not real impressive on a hot summer day.
Daishi
It would be pretty simple to build a heating/cooling system on a lot of motorcycles that blows air out a detachable hose but it would require wearing custom clothing with channels for the air to follow.
On a hot day you really don't even need to cool the air being blown into the suit. Just the airflow alone from the hose would help cool you. Considering how often people don't wear enough safety gear because it's too hot out having the ability to blow air into the suit would actually be a useful safety feature.
I drove a tank in the service and there is an air hose for the driver that I did just this with. It's amazing how much a small amount of airflow matters once it's blowing inside your suit.
Wearing a lot of gear on a hot day is tolerable if you are rolling but once you slow down or get stuck in traffic it's pretty rough.