Architecture

Flat-packed Mini House 2.0 has electricity and a fitted kitchen

Flat-packed Mini House 2.0 has...
The Mini House is a flat-packed house that can be constructed in a matter of days (Photo: Andy Liffner)
The Mini House is a flat-packed house that can be constructed in a matter of days (Photo: Andy Liffner)
View 21 Images
The Mini House is a flat-packed house that can be constructed in a matter of days (Photo: Andy Liffner)
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The Mini House is a flat-packed house that can be constructed in a matter of days (Photo: Andy Liffner)
The area of a Mini House starts at 15 sq m (161 sq ft) (Photo: Andy Liffner)
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The area of a Mini House starts at 15 sq m (161 sq ft) (Photo: Andy Liffner)
Mini Houses are designed to be quick to construct and built using recyclable prefabricated modules (Photo: Andy Liffner)
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Mini Houses are designed to be quick to construct and built using recyclable prefabricated modules (Photo: Andy Liffner)
The Mini House 2.0 is more developed than the original version and has more configuration options (Photo: Andy Liffner)
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The Mini House 2.0 is more developed than the original version and has more configuration options (Photo: Andy Liffner)
The Mini House 2.0 is also modular, allowing multiple units to be joined together for more space (Photo: Andy Liffner)
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The Mini House 2.0 is also modular, allowing multiple units to be joined together for more space (Photo: Andy Liffner)
The Mini House 2.0 has wooden flooring and wooden paneled interior walls, whilst electricity and insulation come as standard (Photo: Andy Liffner)
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The Mini House 2.0 has wooden flooring and wooden paneled interior walls, whilst electricity and insulation come as standard (Photo: Andy Liffner)
The interior fittings and add-ons of the Mini House 2.0 are finalized in advance so that the house is ready to use once it's been constructed on-site (Photo: Andy Liffner)
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The interior fittings and add-ons of the Mini House 2.0 are finalized in advance so that the house is ready to use once it's been constructed on-site (Photo: Andy Liffner)
The Mini House 2.0 is currently only available in Sweden (Photo: Lars Petter Pettersen)
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The Mini House 2.0 is currently only available in Sweden (Photo: Lars Petter Pettersen)
Discussion with a partner are underway for the Mini House 2.0 to be distributed in Central Europe (Photo: Lars Petter Pettersen)
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Discussion with a partner are underway for the Mini House 2.0 to be distributed in Central Europe (Photo: Lars Petter Pettersen)
The Mini House 2.0 costs from start €24,000 (US$29,550), or €34,000 ($41,860) for a model with a kitchen fitted (Photo: Lars Petter Pettersen)
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The Mini House 2.0 costs from start €24,000 (US$29,550), or €34,000 ($41,860) for a model with a kitchen fitted (Photo: Lars Petter Pettersen)
A front view of the Mini House Wide (Image: Jonas Wagell)
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A front view of the Mini House Wide (Image: Jonas Wagell)
A front-right corner view of the Mini House Wide (Image: Jonas Wagell)
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A front-right corner view of the Mini House Wide (Image: Jonas Wagell)
A front-left view of the Mini House Wide (Image: Jonas Wagell)
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A front-left view of the Mini House Wide (Image: Jonas Wagell)
A side view of the Mini House Wide (Image: Jonas Wagell)
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A side view of the Mini House Wide (Image: Jonas Wagell)
A rear-corner view of the Mini House Wide (Image: Jonas Wagell)
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A rear-corner view of the Mini House Wide (Image: Jonas Wagell)
A view of the Mini House 2.0 kitchen (Image: Jonas Wagell)
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A view of the Mini House 2.0 kitchen (Image: Jonas Wagell)
A front view of the Mini House Long (Image: Jonas Wagell)
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A front view of the Mini House Long (Image: Jonas Wagell)
A front-right corner view of the Mini House Long (Image: Jonas Wagell)
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A front-right corner view of the Mini House Long (Image: Jonas Wagell)
A front-left corner view of the Mini House Long (Image: Jonas Wagell)
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A front-left corner view of the Mini House Long (Image: Jonas Wagell)
A rear-corner view of the Mini House Long (Image: Jonas Wagell)
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A rear-corner view of the Mini House Long (Image: Jonas Wagell)
A rear-corner view of the Mini House Long (Image: Jonas Wagell)
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A rear-corner view of the Mini House Long (Image: Jonas Wagell)
View gallery - 21 images

The virtues of a simple, low-cost and sustainable lifestyle have driven the growth of the tiny house movement. Jonas Wagell's Mini Houses embody these values. Having initially been designed as a weekend cabin or guest house, the Mini House is now in its second iteration.

Gizmag first featured the Mini House in 2012, when the first prototypes were already in use in Sweden. It was designed to be quick to construct, and built using recyclable prefabricated modules. Due to its size, the Mini House also didn't need a building permit in Sweden.

The Mini House 2.0, which was being designed when we featured the original version, is based on the same goals and principles, but is slightly more developed and has more configuration options available from which to choose. A model covering an area of 15 sq m (161 sq ft) is still available, but is now joined by a longer version. The Mini House 2.0 is also modular, allowing multiple units to be joined together for more space.

A front-left view of the Mini House Wide (Image: Jonas Wagell)
A front-left view of the Mini House Wide (Image: Jonas Wagell)

The interior layout of the Mini House 2.0 can be altered depending on the user’s requirements for bedrooms, kitchen, bathroom and living space. All the houses have wooden flooring and wooden-paneled interior walls, whilst electricity and insulation come as standard. Details for interior fittings and add-ons are now finalized and prepared in advance so that the house is basically ready to use once it's been constructed on-site.

The houses are designed to be delivered to their planned sites on a lorry in prefabricated sections. "In theory, only a plinth foundation needs to be prepared, unless the houses are equipped with kitchen or bath which require further work with sewage etcetera," explains designer Jonas Wagell to Gizmag. "We have amended the dimensions to be optimized for shipping pre-build."

The Mini House 2.0 is currently only available in Sweden, although Wagell says a discussion with a potential partner in Belgium are ongoing for its distribution in Central Europe. Prices start from €24,000 (US$29,550), or €34,000 ($41,860) for a model with a kitchen fitted.

Source: Mini House

View gallery - 21 images
5 comments
SuperFool
In medieval japan, people had a wood/stucco town house for winter and a collapsable shoji screen house for summer which they transported to & from their distant farms in a cart, so nobody would squat in it while they were away. The trick is having a place to put these clever follies. The reality is if you have a place, then you're automatically obliged to a landlord or taxman/building-dept which really defeats the whole idea of a light & portable house.
Vince Pack
I really love on he idea of small (or large) prefab home construction. What I don't like is $185/ft sq cost. Seriously, there is absolutely no reason there are no cost effective options (yet?) for the awesome little bits of homestead. This type of construction should have already become the standard for most residential building, but the cost is totally out of reason.
If I had the budget for a startup, I would be all over buying an old factory/warehouse and setting up shop. I've run numbers a few times, and standard per square foot costs could be around $75 for an off-the-shelf model with mid-grade compliments.
The same observation holds with shipping container homes, as well - but the square foot costs should be even lower. The model construction projects are great, but they tend to showcase cutting edge technology and designer features - at cutting edge prices. I really hope prefab and container homes become affordable for the average buyer in the very near term.
Bob
Still nothing as livable or cheap as my 19 foot travel trailer which I can easily transport anywhere and costs under $12,000. That price includes furniture, kitchen, bath, air-conditioning and furnace. With a 3500W portable generator and two large trolling batteries, I am off the grid as well.
Sheryl Lord
mini houses are just a prettied up version of a cardboard box that the homeless live in,and cost more than simply building a 1,000 sf house.yes,they are "cute".that is their only "pro" point.
Pat Pending
"Mini House 2.0" No, it's called a shed with some decking.
I've bought and fitted out plenty for clients. Good insulation, plumbing, electrics as required. Finished in days. Make good garden offices or over spill bedrooms/artists studios. Normally no planning required.
"...has electricity and a fitted kitchen" Good grief, shock horror, hold the front page. Why does this merit a Gizmag article?
PS. What's with the totally function-less roof?