Automotive

Toyota launches its Fuel Cell Vehicle as the "Mirai"

Toyota launches its Fuel Cell ...
Toyota's Mirai is the result of 20 years of R&D
Toyota's Mirai is the result of 20 years of R&D
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Toyota's Mirai is the result of 20 years of R&D
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Toyota's Mirai is the result of 20 years of R&D
The Mirai refuels in five minutes
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The Mirai refuels in five minutes
Toyota is building a hydrogen infrastructure in the north-eastern US
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Toyota is building a hydrogen infrastructure in the north-eastern US
The Mirai features a 153 bhp power train
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The Mirai features a 153 bhp power train
The Toyota Mirai will be available late in 2015
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The Toyota Mirai will be available late in 2015
The Toyota Mirai at the LA Auto Show (Photo: CC Weiss/ Gizmag.com)
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The Toyota Mirai at the LA Auto Show (Photo: CC Weiss/ Gizmag.com)
The Toyota Mirai is the result of twenty years of R&D and ten years of road testing – this model of the internals is currently being shown at the LA Auto Show (Photo: CC Weiss/ Gizmag.com)
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The Toyota Mirai is the result of twenty years of R&D and ten years of road testing – this model of the internals is currently being shown at the LA Auto Show (Photo: CC Weiss/ Gizmag.com)
The Toyota Mirai at the LA Auto Show (Photo: CC Weiss / Gizmag.com)
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The Toyota Mirai at the LA Auto Show (Photo: CC Weiss / Gizmag.com)
The Mirai refuels in five minutes (Photo: CC Weiss / Gizmag.com)
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The Mirai refuels in five minutes (Photo: CC Weiss / Gizmag.com)
The Toyota Mirai is the result of twenty years of R&D and ten years of road testing (Photo: CC Weiss / Gizmag.com)
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The Toyota Mirai is the result of twenty years of R&D and ten years of road testing (Photo: CC Weiss / Gizmag.com)
The Toyota Mirai at the LA Auto Show (Photo: CC Weiss / Gizmag.com)
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The Toyota Mirai at the LA Auto Show (Photo: CC Weiss / Gizmag.com)
The Toyota Mirai at the LA Auto Show (Photo: CC Weiss / Gizmag.com)
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The Toyota Mirai at the LA Auto Show (Photo: CC Weiss / Gizmag.com)

On the night before its official launch, Toyota President Akio Toyoda announced that the company's fuel cell vehicle (FCV) will be called the "Mirai." The name, which means "future" in Japanese, marks what the car maker sees as a turning point in automotive technology with the development of both a hydrogen-powered vehicle and an expanded hydrogen fueling infrastructure.

Gizmag has been following the progress of the Mirai née FCV for some time. The result of twenty years of R&D and ten years of road testing, the Mirai refuels in five minutes, has a 153 bhp power plant, goes 300 mi (483 km) on a tank of hydrogen, puts out enough electricity to run a house for a week, emits only water, yet boasts a low center of gravity and, according to Toyota, very dynamic handling.

To keep the Mirai from becoming a boutique car chained to a few local fueling points, Toyota CEO Jim Lentz announced that the company will expand its hydrogen fueling stations base out of California with an investment to build a new chain of hydrogen stations in five states of the US Northeastern corridor. New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island will receive an initial 12 hydrogen stations in collaboration with Air Liquide. According to Toyota, the new stations will be strategically located with the first focus on New York and Boston.

Toyota is building a hydrogen infrastructure in the north-eastern US
Toyota is building a hydrogen infrastructure in the north-eastern US

"Toyota’s vision of a hydrogen society is not just about building a great car, but ensuring accessible, reliable and convenient refueling for our customers," says Lentz. "I am happy to announce that this vision will expand beyond the borders of California and give customers the opportunity to join the fuel cell movement."

The Toyota Mirai is the result of twenty years of R&D and ten years of road testing – this model of the internals is currently being shown at the LA Auto Show (Photo: CC Weiss/ Gizmag.com)
The Toyota Mirai is the result of twenty years of R&D and ten years of road testing – this model of the internals is currently being shown at the LA Auto Show (Photo: CC Weiss/ Gizmag.com)

The Mirai goes on sale in late 2015 for US$57,000 in California with expansion into the Northeast in 2016. It's currently on display at the 2014 LA Auto Show.

The video below shows Akio Toyoda introducing the Mirai.

Source: Toyota

Akio Toyoda introduces Toyota's "Mirai" Fuel Cell Sedan

15 comments
Michael Wilson
sigh. Why must all these revolutionary, fuel efficient cars be so ugly.
Douglas Loss
I like the idea of a commercially-available hydrogen fuel cell car, but that is one damned ugly looking vehicle!
mooseman
Man, that is an *ugly* car! Do car companies *deliberately* design ugly cars like this? Sheesh.......
yawood
I concur.
Slowburn
What none existent problem is this expensive piece of ugliness suppose to solve?
GeoffG
What a shame they didn't give it a reverse angled rear windshield! That way, it could be the ugliest car of all time (sorry Edsel).
Richard Orr
Beauty as they say is in the eye of the beholder, if you're looking at a fuel cell car, why not find out what it does. I think you're looking at the wrong end.
Bob809
To all those calling it ugly -at least the Americans amongst you- I would say a similar thing about the American car industry, still producing vehicles that look little different than they did 10 or more years ago. A Ford F150 pick up cannot be mistaken for anything else, as it still looks the same as it did -bar a few tweaks here and there- years ago. Only recently have companies like Ford progressed with car -as opposed to trucks- design because of the world wide model philosophy. Even they look slightly different. I admit, I like a lot of American cars and trucks, but to say this car is ugly is missing the point. It looks 'different' than mainstream cars. At the price they are selling it for, and with the new tech it should look different than 'ordinary' gas guzzling cars and trucks. BTW, I drive a Toyota iQ, so I like ugly cars.
johnflood
I think fuel cell will be the future in cars it offers so much, but I'm afraid this car is one ugly car that could turn into swan once inside but the problem is when you get out again !1
Esteban Sperber Frankel
Where are the americans auto makers?, it is easy to be critical of the beauty of a car, but technology is not more american, that is why are so critical, where are the american auto makers?, the americans now are only consumers not more engineering, only money, money and money, they don't know more.