Bicycles

8-in-1 Monkeycycle grows from stroller, to bike, to tilting quad

8-in-1 Monkeycycle grows from ...
Two different configurations of the Monkeycycle
Two different configurations of the Monkeycycle
View 13 Images
The tilting quad-bike
1/13
The tilting quad-bike
The pedal trike
2/13
The pedal trike
The pedal two-wheeler
3/13
The pedal two-wheeler
A high-seated balancing bike
4/13
A high-seated balancing bike
A low-seated balancing bike
5/13
A low-seated balancing bike
Two different configurations of the Monkeycycle
6/13
Two different configurations of the Monkeycycle
The stroller kit may not be available for several months
7/13
The stroller kit may not be available for several months
The stroller kit
8/13
The stroller kit
The pedal-free version of the trike
9/13
The pedal-free version of the trike
Trike with pedals
10/13
Trike with pedals
The stroller
11/13
The stroller
The tilting quad-bike
12/13
The tilting quad-bike
Currently available for preorder on Kickstarter
13/13
Currently available for preorder on Kickstarter
View gallery - 13 images

Grow bikes are nothing new in the children's bicycle scene, however Monkeycycle is an extraordinarily modular new innovation designed to offer your child eight different configurations, morphing from a stroller for the nine-month-old, to a pedal-powered quad bike for a six-year-old, and a few configurations in between.

Kids grow out of stuff really fast and bicycles are no exception. We've seen several innovative grow bikes over the years, designed to effectively expand so parents don't have to buy a new bike for their child every 12 months. The new Monkeycycle takes the idea of a grow bike to an impressive new level, with a clever design allowing a single bike to turn into eight different kits.

The first iteration for the Monkeycycle is its stroller formation. This is being offered as part of a stretch goal during the Kickstarter campaign so the company suggests it is still under development. The current stroller configuration outlined offers a locking brake for the rear axle, and a storage bag. This is claimed to still be six to eight months away from general release.

The stroller kit
The stroller kit

The next three iterations form the Monkeycycle's basic kit. This comprises a simple two-wheeler, offering both a low-seat and a high-seat balance bike. The basic kit also comes with a pedal attachment for that key transition point where your child can start to learn to pedal.

A high-seated balancing bike
A high-seated balancing bike

The next kit up is the trike kit. This essentially adds a third wheel to the whole operation allowing the bike to be swiftly turned into a trike. The full kit offers a few extra pieces allowing for a pedal system to be added to the trike configurations. On top of this, the full kit allows for a tilting quad-bike configuration.

The tilting quad-bike
The tilting quad-bike

The entire Monkeycycle system is designed for children up to the age of six. It's maximum seat height rises to 25 in (63.5 cm), and with a 150-lb (68-kg) weight limit it may very well last your child a little longer if you're lucky.

Monkeycycle is currently available for preorder on Kickstarter at US$249 for the basic kit and $349 for the full kit. Early bird prices are slightly cheaper, but have just about all sold out as the campaign has already surpassed its goal. The usual Kickstarter disclaimer applies here, as the company doesn't have a notable background in crowdfunding although it claims to be relatively close to production with delivery scheduled for March 2019.

Take a look at the campaign video below.

Source: Monkeycycle

Monkeycycle: The 8-in-1 Bike That Grows With Your Child

View gallery - 13 images
5 comments
GordonHoffman
I would like to see the leaning feature of the quadcycle - there was no leaning done in the video. Looks like a potentially great product.
Lardo
I can see some poor kid rolling down a hill on that quad... and taking a corner a bit too fast. KERPLUNK.
Douglas Bennett Rogers
The benefit of the lean-to-turn trike or quad is that it can slide without falling. It can be light because the wheels don't have to support torque or lateral forces.
shinnam
Wish they would make an adult version, except instead of a stroller a grocery cart. Then It could be used even when there is ice and snow.
YuraG
given how much Lego toys cost, this is a bargain if it works as advertised. besides it makes kids move rather than get stuck near a pile of bricks. walmart should keep an eye on this set, with all the safety gear standard