Motorcycles

Bandit9 Supermarine motorcycle stands out on any street

Bandit9 Supermarine motorcycle...
Rolling Art: The Supermarine is being manufactured on a built-to-order basis
Rolling Art: The Supermarine is being manufactured on a built-to-order basis
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Rolling Art: The Supermarine is being manufactured on a built-to-order basis
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Rolling Art: The Supermarine is being manufactured on a built-to-order basis
At the heart of the Supermarine is a 7075 aluminum chassis, covered in the buyer's choice of an ABS plastic or lighter-weight carbon fiber body
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At the heart of the Supermarine is a 7075 aluminum chassis, covered in the buyer's choice of an ABS plastic or lighter-weight carbon fiber body
The Supermarine is powered by a liquid-cooled, 8-valve, SOHC, 900cc Triumph engine that can be upgraded to 1,200 cc
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The Supermarine is powered by a liquid-cooled, 8-valve, SOHC, 900cc Triumph engine that can be upgraded to 1,200 cc
The Supermarine meets Euro5 emissions standards
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The Supermarine meets Euro5 emissions standards
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When we last heard about Vietnamese custom motorcycle builder Bandit9, it was creating a shiny sci-fi scrambler that started out as a 1967 Honda Supersport. The company's new Supermarine drops the retro angle entirely – this bike is definitely from the future.

Taking its name from the British company that built the Spitfire fighter plane – so no, not too futuristic in that way – the Supermarine is powered by a liquid-cooled, 8-valve, SOHC, 900cc Triumph Twin engine that can be upgraded to 1,200 cc.

The 900 version puts out 74.1 bhp at 7,500 rpm, produces 59 ft lb (80 Nm) of torque at 3,800 rpm, and is reportedly capable of reaching a top speed of 193 km/h (120 mph). Moving things up a few notches, the 1,200 puts out 103 bhp at 7,250 rpm, produces 83 ft lb (113 Nm) at 4,250 rpm, and goes up to 210 km/h (130 mph). Fuel consumption is a claimed 68.9 mpg (4.1 l/100km). No acceleration figures have been provided.

The Supermarine meets Euro5 emissions standards
The Supermarine meets Euro5 emissions standards

At the heart of the Supermarine is a 7075 aluminum chassis, covered in the buyer's choice of an ABS plastic or lighter-weight carbon fiber body. Both are designed with aerodynamics in mind (along with looks, no doubt), and are said to be inspired by the flowing form of ray fishes. The whole bike reportedly tips the scales at 216 kg (476 lb) in its base configuration, or 190 kg (419 lb) upgraded.

Some of its other features include electronic fuel injection; a stainless steel exhaust system (upgradable to titanium); Nitron suspension (upgradable to Ohlins); Brembo 4-piston brakes (upgradable to Beringer Aerotec 6-piston); and a custom LED display.

The Supermarine is powered by a liquid-cooled, 8-valve, SOHC, 900cc Triumph engine that can be upgraded to 1,200 cc
The Supermarine is powered by a liquid-cooled, 8-valve, SOHC, 900cc Triumph engine that can be upgraded to 1,200 cc

Each Supermarine is built to order and there's no guide on pricing, so brave prospective buyers will need to contact the company for a quote. First deliveries are expected to take place in December.

Source: Bandit9

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9 comments
9 comments
possum1
So, take a Triumph T100, butcher it, make it unrideable in the real world, don't make it noticeably lighter, and charge heaps - yeah that'll work.
It has all the right words - catchy name, titanium, carbon fibre, Brembo, Ohlin's, built to order - just does not ring my bell at all.
So I guess this jaded real world rider will have to stick with what I've got, and leave this to the cashed up Hipsters - are they still a thing ?
svenne
There are so many designs out there that seem to derive from Finnish Naulapää concept bikes. Such a shame they never came to life. https://thenewcaferacersociety.blogspot.com/2007/12/conceptual-designs-of-heikki-naulap.html
Mayhem
Do those exhaust cans really point directly at the rider's shin bones? That looks like a really dodgy design feature.
mediabeing
It's pretty. It would make a nice collector's piece, but it's definitely not a mass production bike.
Just one laying over on the ground would make it ugly.
jerryd
It doesn't matter how aero something it is a person sits on it.. Had they made the fairing large enough to hide the rider from the airstream they would have 80 more HP for acceleration at 100mph instead of lost in air drag.
Catweazle
No cornering clearance whatsoever and not enough go for a traffic light dragster.
Fail.
Martin Hone
A triumph of form over function, sadly.
allen29
Looks like the rider's knees tuck in behind that shroud, and the exhaust exits...through the crook behind the rider's knee? Weird.

Do they not do catalysts in the UK?
alexD
that tree log on your backyard is probably much more comfy......