Motorcycles

BMW releases its first M-series motorcycle, the extraordinary M1000RR

BMW releases its first M-serie...
The S1000RR was already a sharp track bike but the M1000RR takes things up a notch
The S1000RR was already a sharp track bike but the M1000RR takes things up a notch
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The S1000RR was already a sharp track bike but the M1000RR takes things up a notch
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The S1000RR was already a sharp track bike but the M1000RR takes things up a notch
The M1000RR, left, with the current BMW S1000RR world superbike racer
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The M1000RR, left, with the current BMW S1000RR world superbike racer
A highly focused street-legal track machine
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A highly focused street-legal track machine
Carbon wheels should help this baby flick from side to side in a heartbeat
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Carbon wheels should help this baby flick from side to side in a heartbeat
BMW's first M-badge motorcycle isn't as much of a leap as that badge implies in the car world, but that's because the stock S1000RR is already such a beast
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BMW's first M-badge motorcycle isn't as much of a leap as that badge implies in the car world, but that's because the stock S1000RR is already such a beast
M Competition kit adds lots of carbon and sweet adjustable levers, among other goodies
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M Competition kit adds lots of carbon and sweet adjustable levers, among other goodies
Carbon winglets are the most visually prominent element
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Carbon winglets are the most visually prominent element
The new symmetrical headlight setup now has wings beneath it
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The new symmetrical headlight setup now has wings beneath it
Full color dash and a load of buttons and dials to play with on the go
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Full color dash and a load of buttons and dials to play with on the go
Winglets are really a superbike racing consideration, adding more than 16 kg of downforce at speed
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Winglets are really a superbike racing consideration, adding more than 16 kg of downforce at speed
Sexy adjustable foot controls with the M Competition package
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Sexy adjustable foot controls with the M Competition package
High screen helps you squeeze out that last few mph of top speed
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High screen helps you squeeze out that last few mph of top speed
100 percent ready for serious track and race use
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100 percent ready for serious track and race use
Akrapovic has provided a new exhaust system with titanium at the headers, mid pipes and end can, saving you more than 3.5 kg
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Akrapovic has provided a new exhaust system with titanium at the headers, mid pipes and end can, saving you more than 3.5 kg
Full carbon wheels and BMW's new maintenance-free M Endurance chain
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Full carbon wheels and BMW's new maintenance-free M Endurance chain
Up/down quickshifter can be quickly switched to a one up/five down race shift
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Up/down quickshifter can be quickly switched to a one up/five down race shift
M1000RR left side
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M1000RR left side
BMW is using its own M-branded brake calipers
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BMW is using its own M-branded brake calipers
View gallery - 18 images

BMW has announced its most powerful motorcycle ever – a lightweight, juiced-up version of its outstanding S1000RR superbike that becomes the first bike to wear the storied M badge. The M1000RR is a razor-edged track bike that's also street-legal.

From the outset, the current-generation S1000RR has been available with an "M Sport" package, but BMW Motorrad has taken things up a notch in the creation of the new M-RR bike. The company admits the M badge won't transform the bike as comprehensively as it tends to in the car world, because the S-RR is already so damn fast, but the M bike sharpens things considerably and offers a new homologation base for BMW's World Superbike efforts.

Yes, it's lighter and more powerful. The M-RR is some 5 kg (11 lb) lighter than the S bike at 192 kg (423 lb), thanks largely to its standard featherweight carbon wheels and a new Akrapovic exhaust system that's titanium from the header pipes to the end can.

The motor has been modified with a raised redline of 15,100 rpm, Mahle forged pistons, Pankl titanium conrods, increased cylinder compression, and a bunch of other edits around the intakes, camshafts and rocker arms, resulting in 212 horsepower, a step up of 5 hp from the standard bike. But there's also a change in character away from the flexibility of the streetbike to a track focus that emphasizes midrange and top-end speed for a bigger slingshot effect as the revs come up. Top speed is up to 306 km/h (190 mph), and 0-200 km/h (0-124 mph) is now in the 6-7 second range.

M Competition kit adds lots of carbon and sweet adjustable levers, among other goodies
M Competition kit adds lots of carbon and sweet adjustable levers, among other goodies

I get the sense that one of the key reasons for this bike is that BMW really wants to run winglets in World Superbike, and according to regulations it can only do so if the homologated street bike's got 'em too. So the M-RR runs a set of carbon winglets up front that contribute some 16.2 kg (36 lb) of downforce at speed, helping keep the front wheel down for maximum acceleration on track and less intervention from the traction control system.

Call me old-fashioned, but I think these things look pretty silly on the street, where hundredths of a second don't matter and you get bonus hero points from your riding buddies for sweet wheelies – but such is the way of progress.

BMW is using its own M-branded brake calipers
BMW is using its own M-branded brake calipers

Going against the grain, BMW has decided to put its own M-branded brake calipers on the M-RR instead of running Brembo gear like everyone else. It's not clear whether BMW is manufacturing these things itself or just creating the design and outsourcing production, but either way, they're very distinctively blue, and the company says they offer outstanding control and strong performance when they heat up under hard, repetitive loads on the track.

In terms of the chassis, weight distribution has been altered, suspension attention has been given to controlling dive on the brakes and squat on the gas, and the swingarm pivot point can now be adjusted for fine control of geometry.

If you're planning to go racing – and BMW says this thing is pretty much ready to roll – you can option up with an M Competition package that gives you GPS lap tracking, carbon bodywork parts, a lighter swingarm, BMW's "maintenance free" M Endurance chain, an aerodynamic cowl for the rear seat and some milled, adjustable aluminum replacements for the levers, footrests and other bits.

100 percent ready for serious track and race use
100 percent ready for serious track and race use

Naturally, it costs a bomb – US$39,385 is your base pay to play figure. That's a considerable premium over Honda's $28,500, 215-hp, 201-kg (443-lb) Fireblade SP, but peanuts next to the $100k you'll need to shell out for a similarly winged Ducati Superleggera V4. It's fair enough though, the Diet Duke earns its sky-high price tag with a ridiculous 231 peak horsepower and an equally stunning 152 kg (335 lb) weight figure that frankly boggles the mind.

It remains to be seen whether the M-RR can finally vault BMW past the seemingly untouchable Kawasaki team to finally take a World Superbike title, but BMW's superbikes have always been special on the road. Enjoy a launch video below and plenty of detail photos in the gallery.

The new BMW M 1000 RR - Live Podcast

Source: BMW Motorrad

View gallery - 18 images
1 comment
ClaudioB
I'm not a biker, but is it normal like that or is the brake disk looking like a badly marked one, with all those grooves on its surface?