Space

NASA video release takes viewers on a tour of Ceres

NASA video release takes viewe...
Ceres as imaged by Dawn on from a distance of 8,500 miles (13,500 kilometers)
Ceres as imaged by Dawn on from a distance of 8,500 miles (13,500 kilometers)
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Ceres as imaged by Dawn on from a distance of 8,500 miles (13,500 kilometers)
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Ceres as imaged by Dawn on from a distance of 8,500 miles (13,500 kilometers)
Ceres as taken by the Hubble Space Telescope in January 2004
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Ceres as taken by the Hubble Space Telescope in January 2004

NASA has released avideo of Ceres that takes viewers on a tour across the surface of therocky planet. The video is based on observations made by the agency'sDawn spacecraft over the course of its first mapping orbit at adistance of 8,400 miles (13,600 km) as well as more recentnavigational images taken from 3,200 miles (5,100 km).

"We used athree-dimensional terrain model that we had produced based on theimages acquired so far," states Dawn team member Ralf Jaumann ofthe German Aerospace Center. "They willbecome increasingly detailed as the mission progresses, with eachadditional orbit bringing us closer to the surface."

Dawn made orbit aroundCeres on March 6 following intense speculation as to thenature of a series of white spots that had been detected on thesurface of the dwarf planet duringthe approach. Currently, the reason for the bright spots has not beendetermined, leading NASA to host a public vote allowing participantsto guess between salt deposits, ice, rock, geysers, and even thepresence of volcanoes as the culprit for the unusual features.

Ceres as taken by the Hubble Space Telescope in January 2004
Ceres as taken by the Hubble Space Telescope in January 2004

Tosom,e the video may seem short, but you have to take a step back andappreciate what it represents. Ceres was the first object to bediscovered in the asteroid belt, and has been known to ussince Sicilian astronomer Father Giuseppe Piazzi observed the dwarf planetback in 1801. Yet, prior to Jan.25. of this year, the most detailed image we had of the rocky bodywas a tiny blurry sphere captured by the Hubble Space Telescope.

AsDawn drew ever nearer to Ceres, we began to see it in greaterdetail until the new images surpassed thoseof the legendary space telescope. Just a few months later, Dawn hasobserved the surface of the dwarf planet to the extent that we cananimate a detailed map of the surface. With this in mind, it's notjust a video, it's a testament to mankind's limitless curiosity andpotential.

NASA's tour of Ceres can be seen in the video below..

Source:NASA

Fly Over Dwarf Planet Ceres

3 comments
CharlieSeattle
What did NASA spend on this?
I could have done this for ya with an old bowling ball and a ball peen hammer for $9.00 + shipping. What did NASA spend on this?
faceless minion
The rims/edges of some of the craters look as though erosion has occurred. Is that merely debris from nearby impacts?
windykites
I noticed that they had exaggerated the heights by two times. What is the point of this? A natural view would have been more realistic.
What always puzzles me about these small planets/moons, is that almost every crater is circular. This implies that all impact meteorites are coming in perpendicularly, on every part of the surface. This also implies that the meteorites have been attracted by gravity. To my mind this is highly unlikely, because of the small size of the primary object, which is travelling through space. If for example it travelled through an area of many small fragments, there would be many oval craters, radiating from the central area of impacts.
Can anyone explain this phenomenon to me?