Automotive

New Nissan Leaf to feature single e-Pedal control

New Nissan Leaf to feature sin...
Nissan's upcoming Leaf will allow drivers to stop and start using a single pedal
Nissan's upcoming Leaf will allow drivers to stop and start using a single pedal
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Nissan's upcoming Leaf will allow drivers to stop and start using a single pedal
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Nissan's upcoming Leaf will allow drivers to stop and start using a single pedal
Nissan's upcoming Leaf will allow drivers to stop and start using a single pedal
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Nissan's upcoming Leaf will allow drivers to stop and start using a single pedal

Nissan has continued the drip-feed of feature announcements ahead of the launch of the upcoming Leaf, today revealing that the next-gen electric vehicle will sport a so-called e-Pedal that can be used to accelerate, slow down and come to a complete stop.

Single pedal operation is a feature built into a number of electric vehicles as a way of simplifying driving and recapturing energy lost during deceleration. This approach to regenerative braking can be seen in cars such as the BMW i3 and Chevy Bolt, but according to Nissan, the upcoming Leaf will take things a little further.

The company says it will be the first car in the world that allows drivers to come to a standstill on hills, hold position, and then resume driving again with a single pedal.

The e-Pedal will be activated by a switch that turns the otherwise regular accelerator into one pedal to rule them all. Easing off the pedal will reduce the car's speed, while releasing it will bring it to a stop and hold its position, even on an incline. Nissan says that users will be able to handle 90 percent of their driving with the e-Pedal.

The animation below offers an overview of how it works.

Source: Nissan

New Nissan LEAF with e-Pedal premieres in the U.S. September 5 (September 6 in Japan)

20 comments
Cedthecanuck
How would coasting work with this system?
Ralf Biernacki
Unfortunately, the panic reaction to an impending crash is to dig one's feet in. In a normal car, the foot presses into the brake, stopping the car. Even, so, there are incidents when the accelerator is pressed by mistake. In this poorly-thought out e-Pedal design, pressing down hard will accelerate, making the crash worse. It would take a conscious deliberate inhibition of the panic response to actually ease off, braking the car---something that is not likely to happen, except maybe with Stig behind the wheel. A much safer and more sensible design would be to brake by pushing down, and accelerate by easing off---treat the ePedal conceptually as an enhanced brake, rather than an enhanced accelerator.
RXStephen
Coasting would only work if you have the switch off. Otherwise you would need to always hold some accelerator on if your not using cruise control. It looks more like a gimmick to me, a smart regen brake pedal that activates the mechanical brakes by wire would be better. This is just extremely heavy regen braking that probably activates the mechanical brakes for holding the car at stops. I hope it also activates the brake lights when heavy decelerating.
VincentWolf
ePedal sounds like a backup power source----pedaling.
That's not going to make a big impression.
BorisFohrman
Freederick is absolutely correct this pedal needs relearning of driving techniques also what is "exiting driving" meanig trying to stop but accelerating instead,drop stupid Madison Ave speak talk, normal ,I assume by exiting your copy righter meant fast.
Nahor
I agree with Freederick. Also, I suspect that non of the Nissan engineers play video games or saw someone playing them. One just needs to see how controllers get moved around to "push the character in the right direction faster" and how hard buttons are pressed to punch harder/shoot faster to realize how bad an idea it is.
WilliamSager
Strikes me that if all controls are to be electronic you could just as easily control thrust with your thumb or finger.
VincentWolf
Has to be tough pedaling with one pedal.
Grelly
I'm confused too. If I understand correctly, you brake by lifting your foot. So you control the rate of braking by how quickly you lift your foot? Doesn't that mean that if your foot slips of the pedal you do an emergency stop?
Freederick's idea is better, but if your foot slips off the brake in traffic, you accelerate rapidly into the back of the car in front.
Jason Catterall
Aah, the interweb's full of positivity today I see. Why don't we wait and try it before slamming Nissans engineers?