Marine

PeleBoard takes a stride toward leg-powered paddleboarding

PeleBoard takes a stride towar...
The PeleBoard lets users' legs in on the action
The PeleBoard lets users' legs in on the action
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The PeleBoard lets users' legs in on the action
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The PeleBoard lets users' legs in on the action
The carbon fiber board is split lengthwise down the middle
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The carbon fiber board is split lengthwise down the middle
On the underside of both halves are scute-style flaps
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On the underside of both halves are scute-style flaps
A double-bladed paddle is also included
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A double-bladed paddle is also included

Paddlesports are a great workout for the upper body, but as far as the legs go – not so much. In the case of sit-down watercraft like kayaks, that situation can be addressed by adding pedals. For stand-up paddleboards, however ... well, it's hard to picture how pedals could be integrated. That's why the designers of the PeleBoard have taken their own approach to leg-powered paddleboarding, with a carbon fiber board that's split lengthwise down the middle.

The two halves of the board are joined together via a sliding rail with stainless steel bearings. Additionally, on the underside of both halves are scute-style flaps.

The idea is that as the user strides forward, that side of the board slides with them, the water pressure causing its flaps to fold up flat against the board. Once it's the other side's turn to move forward, however, the flaps on the first side are back down again, allowing it to stay in place by catching the water.

The carbon fiber board is split lengthwise down the middle
The carbon fiber board is split lengthwise down the middle

Moving across the water using that form of locomotion alone might take a while, though, so a double-bladed paddle is also included. Should users wish to just paddle (such as when they're riding waves), the two halves of the board can be temporarily locked together.

Pele Paddleboards co-founder Blake Knutson tells us that the company is planning on raising production funds via a Kickstarter campaign, scheduled to take place next spring (Northern Hemisphere). There's currently no estimate on a retail price although due to the materials involved in its construction, Knutson says "It won't be something everyone on the block can run down and buy."

You can see the board in use, in the following video.

Source: PeleBoards

PeleBoards

7 comments
Gadgeteer
You're kidding. This is original? I remember seeing a DIY project for something like this using styrofoam boards and venetian blinds, on the old PBS children's program, Zoom, circa 1974.
Rehab
Can't imagine this board ever gaining traction in the market. I am amazed by the design and amount of engineering that must gave gone into this. If you miss with this, hope you try another project as you appear to be capable of turning a complex design into a real product. Nice effort and good luck.
Anne Ominous
I'm with Gadgeteer. I think the only reason they can sell these is that the original patent expired 50 or more years ago.
owlbeyou
The concept is great, whoever it was that came up with it and when, but why do the riders in the video look awkward? There is some more refinement needed here to make it go! Even the big muscular guy isn't getting anywhere anytime soon.
sk8dad
Part of the charm of SUP is it's utter simplicity. No SUPer want to deal with maintenance of all those hundreds of moving parts in a seaweed-ridden salt water and sand environment. Plus for rigidity, I imagine this thing weighs at least 20 lbs over the average SUP. In the video none of the paddlers engaged their cores. Instead they all muscled it with their arms and legs. I guess as a workout tool this could have merit, but so is swimming with a parachute.
Jim Sadler
I recall older versions of this board as well. But there is a difference. In the past the two halves were not joined by a rail and acted like roller skates with one float on each foot.I really see no reason why such a device would cost much money. Many people could easily build their own.
Supski
As someone who has tested this concept, I can assure you it doesn't work. You get little or no forward movement by sliding the two halves. I have invented a much simpler design which will debut this June. It only utilizes the upper portion of cross country skiing. The unit will attach to any paddleboard. Stay tuned. For product information, visit Supski.com