Digital Cameras

Pulse lets you control camera settings from a smartphone

Pulse lets you control camera ...
The Pulse is a remote camera trigger which lets you control a DSLR from a smartphone
The Pulse is a remote camera trigger which lets you control a DSLR from a smartphone
View 5 Images
The app for the Pulse remote trigger can be used for shooting stills, videos, or time-lapse
1/5
The app for the Pulse remote trigger can be used for shooting stills, videos, or time-lapse
The Pulse is a remote camera trigger which lets you control a DSLR from a smartphone
2/5
The Pulse is a remote camera trigger which lets you control a DSLR from a smartphone
The Pulse remote trigger is currently on Kickstarter
3/5
The Pulse remote trigger is currently on Kickstarter
The app for the Pulse remote trigger has a clean and simple interface
4/5
The app for the Pulse remote trigger has a clean and simple interface
The Pulse remote trigger connects via USB, but can be mounted to a hot-shoe
5/5
The Pulse remote trigger connects via USB, but can be mounted to a hot-shoe

Pulse is a remote camera trigger for Canon and Nikon DSLRs which allows users to wirelessly control the shutter and adjust settings such as ISO, aperture and shutter speed from their smartphone. The device, which can also be used when shooting video or time-lapses, is currently on Kickstarter, where it exceeded its US$50,000 funding target in just three hours.

Though many new cameras boast built-in wireless features, there are still an awful lot of cameras out there which don't. Pulse is designed to bring powerful remote control functions to Canon and Nikon DSLRs, and is being launched by Alpine Labs, which has previously given us the Michron, Radian, and Radian 2 time-lapse devices.

Pulse connects to the USB port of a camera and is said to be compatible with more than 60 Canon and Nikon cameras which can then be controlled from an iOS or Android device. Alpine Labs says compatibility is currently limited to Canon and Nikon devices because of the way they respond to having a USB device plugged in. A full list of compatible cameras is available in the FAQ section of the crowdfunding project page.

The Pulse remote trigger connects via USB, but can be mounted to a hot-shoe
The Pulse remote trigger connects via USB, but can be mounted to a hot-shoe

The slim Pulse dongle can be mounted to the hot-shoe on a camera and, once plugged in to the USB port, allows access to camera settings on a smartphone via Bluetooth connectivity. The clean and simple app interface is very similar in style to that on the Radian 2, and lets users trigger the shutter to take a photo, and adjust settings including ISO, aperture, and shutter speed, giving considerable creative control. This is useful for times it's just not practical to be by the camera making adjustments and shooting.

While the Bluetooth connection doesn't allow for a live preview, you can preview thumbnail images right after you've taken the photo. Also, in addition to shooting stills the Pulse allows users to start and stop video recording (something few remote triggers can do), or trigger a series of shots at intervals for producing time-lapse videos. Advanced time-lapse options include things like exposure ramping to adjust ISO and shutter speed when capturing day-to-night transitions.

The app for the Pulse remote trigger has a clean and simple interface
The app for the Pulse remote trigger has a clean and simple interface

At the time of writing, Kickstarter pledges start at $74, which is said to be $25 less than the expected retail price. If everything goes to plan with the project, the Pulse triggers are expected to start shipping in April 2016.

You can check out the Pulse Kickstarter video below.

Sources: Alpine Labs, Kickstarter

Pulse Kickstarter Video

2 comments
Calson
Another Camranger type of product though with the design defect of occupying the hot shoe of the camera. A non-photographer may not realize that the hot shoe is where one attaches a flash or a sync cord for a flash or a wireless trigger for a flash. These devices have been on the market for many years and none beat the versatility of the Quantum FreeXwire that was introduced more than 10 years ago and works flawlessly at distances up to 1000 feet and will autofocus and release the shutter and multiple groups of flash units and no smartphone is needed.
ricoslim
Exactly what Calson said - occupying the hot shoe on the camera immediately hinders the ability to use a trigger flash, unless future firmware updates will somehow allow this. Secondly, some companies (e.g. Canon) already have OEM apps for Wi-Fi-enabled cameras that sync with smartphones.