Urban Transport

Stator folding electric scooter pairs plump wheels and wiry frame

Stator folding electric scoote...
The Stator scooter certainly has a look of its own
The Stator scooter certainly has a look of its own
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Optional extras for the Stator include front and rear fenders and racks, a fold-down seat, an LED headlight, and a fast charger that allows for a 1.2-hour juice-up time
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Optional extras for the Stator include front and rear fenders and racks, a fold-down seat, an LED headlight, and a fast charger that allows for a 1.2-hour juice-up time
The Stator scooter already exists in functioning prototype form
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The Stator scooter already exists in functioning prototype form
The Stator scooter certainly has a look of its own
3/3
The Stator scooter certainly has a look of its own
View gallery - 3 images

Judging by the success of the Scrooser and the Phatty, people do like the idea of fat-tired electric scooters. California-based skateboarder/cyclist/product designer Nathan Allen is now attempting to join the throng, with the interesting-looking and apparently self-balancing Stator.

Currently in functioning prototype form, the Stator features a powder-coated chromoly steel tubular frame, a quirky one-sided handlebar that folds down for storage, and a 1,000-watt brushless rear hub motor that takes the scooter up to a top speed of 25 mph (40 km/h).

Power is provided by the buyer's choice of a 10- or 20-Ah 48-volt lithium-ion battery pack located beneath the rider's feet, delivering a claimed range of either 10 or 20 miles (16 or 32 km) per 4-hour charge, respectively.

The Stator scooter already exists in functioning prototype form
The Stator scooter already exists in functioning prototype form

The whole thing tips the scales at 90 lb (41 kg) and can carry riders weighing up to 250 lb (113 kg). Some of its other features include a front hydraulic disc brake, the ability to be powered up via either a standard key or a wireless RFID tag, and three power settings for different rider-experience levels.

Optional extras include front and rear fenders and racks, a fold-down seat, an LED headlight, and a fast charger that allows for a 1.2-hour juice-up time.

We're still waiting to hear back regarding the whole self-balancing thing, as it's not clear if the scooter actually has some sort of internal gyroscopic system (like Lit Motors' C1), or if it stays standing upright simply due to its wide tires. At the very least, they are claimed to offer a cushy, stable ride.

Plans call for the Stator to soon be the subject of a Kickstarter campaign, which interested parties will no doubt be able to access via the link below (there's no word on an estimated retail price). In the meantime, you can see a couple of the prototypes hittin' the road in the following video.

Source: Stator

Stator Ride 5

View gallery - 3 images
8 comments
Reece Agland
Doesn't seem to have a lot of ground clearance so seems only ok for flatish surfaces. Also where is the security in this thing, seems like you just jump on and Bob's your uncle. Too heavy to take with you off the street though. looks good but Q the practicality of it. Plus too slow for traffic, too dangerous for footpaths. Ok for bike paths but not everywhere has such great bike paths.
VincentWolf
Now if it's just reasonably priced......they usually are just for rich kids only.
guzmanchinky
Just wayyyy too big.
Doodah
Looks super cool. Maybe a bit too low to the ground though. If you hit a speedbump is it going to bottom out?
Leonard Foster Jr
Way to heavy, dump the high rolling Resistance Tank wheels put on spoke wheels that would also increase clearance, no need for self balance a good kick stand will do. I luv the simple look
Bionic88
I love the look..has a Batman fat-tired-motorcycle(too lazy to look for the actual name) style. But as others have mentioned it doesn't seem very practical.. ground clearance.. high resistant tires. It might be great for the beach or modified for off-road use. Maybe even snow. It definitely has peaked my interest.. looking forward to the final product.
(((They))) Live
I like it, looks a lot like the German Scroozer, I hope its not priced the same
Nik
Looks like a great example of the engineers rule of thumb, 'KISS' Keep It Simple St...d! or choose your own last. Also looks robust, and the fat tires will give some smoothing out of road induced vibrations. Not my style of toy, I grew out of them by about 7-8 years old, when I got my first bicycle, but there seems to be plenty of customers for them, if the numbers on offer are a guide.