Drums

  • ​Cardboard is generally used as packaging, to house new instruments during transit for example. But we've seen a number of gear innovations actually built using cardboard over the years, and the latest to join the cardboard band is the Beatbox, a MIDI drum machine built into cardboard housing.​
  • Redison hit Kickstarter in 2017 with connected sensors that gave drum sticks a voice of their own. And now it's hoping for a repeat of that crowdfunding success with the Senspad, which wirelessly connects to a smartphone running an app that puts a kit at your disposal.​
  • ​Signal Snowboards notes the integral role that music plays in boarding, and has previously demonstrated its love for mixing the two in cardboard with a snowboard and a Stratocaster guitar fashioned from the packaging material. Now the company has made a working drum kit using cardboard.​
  • ​Around this time last year, Italy's IK Multimedia unveiled its first hardware synthesizer, the UNO Synth. Now the company has added another member to the family with the launch of the UNO Drum.​
  • An innovative percussion instrument has launched on Kickstarter which kind of puts a full drum kit on your chest. The KeyTam features a main drum where the head tension can be adjusted in real time using a lever on a wooden handle, and a number of mini cymbals for tambourine-like accompaniment.
  • ​Music hardware maker Alesis has announced a new multi-tool for solo beatmakers, producers and kit-packing drummers. As well as performing electronic percussion duties, the Strike MultiPad can sample, edit and loop sounds and be used as an audio interface.​
  • Singular Sound has updated the BeatBuddy Mini, a little stomp that puts a realistic sounding virtual drummer at your feet. The Mini 2 now has a new button designed for comfort when playing barefoot.
  • Nathan Webb and Pasquale Totaro want to make music creation accessible to everyone, and have launched the Oddball to do just that. Combining a very familiar object with wireless tech, digital audio and pressure sensors, their project is essentially a beat maker in a bouncy ball.
  • ​A few years back we tried out a "drummer in a stomp" system called the BeatBuddy, which offers real-sounding, foot-controllable accompaniment for solo performers and bedroom jammers alike. A robotic Cajon player called the Cabot follows along the same lines, but is aimed at acoustic players.​
  • After a brief teaser campaign, Roland has revealed a new addition to the company's iconic digital drum machine portfolio – the Aira TR-8S Rhythm Performer. As well as emulating classic 80s drum machines, the 8S lets users import their own samples and allows more hands-on control.
  • Specdrums has been designed for folks who just can't contain their inner rhythm, which breaks out in the form of finger drumming on any surface within reach. The smart ring wirelessly connects to a smartphone running an app and transforms finger taps on colors from everyday objects into sounds.
  • It's August 8, and Roland is celebrating by once again giving musicians the opportunity to back their creations with the robot-like rim shots, unrealistic snare and booming kick of one of the first drum machines, the TR-808. The new TR-08 stays true to the original, but adds a few modern touches.