Kitchen

  • A company called Brava is launching a countertop oven that cooks food quickly and thoroughly using visible and infrared light, and if you cut through the marketing faff it looks like there might just be a useful product hiding under there.
  • ​If there's one thing that robots are good for, it's reducing costs by performing tasks that would otherwise go to human workers. That was part of the inspiration behind Spyce, a new budget-friendly fast food restaurant that has a robotized kitchen.
  • ​​For thousands of years, any knife blade worth its salt has been forged from metal or steel, but Canadian design house Maison Milan has other ideas. It has crafted a wooden knife to carry out preparation duties in style, and can then be used to scoop up your chopped goods when you’re done. ​
  • While we have seen countertop dishwashers before, Heatworks' new Tetra is different. It's smaller than just about any other model, plus it's transparent and it doesn't need to be hooked up to a faucet – all that's required is an electrical outlet.
  • The kitchens is the heart of any home, and just like biological hearts they can sometimes benefit from some technological help. Thankfully there are plenty of smart people working on devices to provide that helping hand – here are a few that caught our eye in 2017.
  • Land Rover has prepared an extraordinary Discovery for Jamie Oliver that slow-cooks under the hood, churns butter and makes ice cream in the hubcaps, slow-turns a rotisserie out front and makes toast in the center console. Forget the drive-through restaurant – this is the driving restaurant kitchen.
  • ​What's easier than writing a shopping list with a pen and paper? Well, maybe nothing, although the makers of Lystr would beg to differ. Their device plugs into a wall outlet in your kitchen, creating a shopping list on your smartphone by scanning barcodes and listening for its name to be spoken.
  • Billed as "the world's first automatic yogurt maker," Yomee allows you to control the sweetener and type of milk, plus it's reportedly much cheaper than buying individual containers of prepared yogurt.​
  • ​Thanks to the Internet of Things, the home of the future could be full of smart devices. A team at Carnegie Mellon University is trying to untangle that web, by developing a single device that uses a suite of sensors to monitor an entire room’s worth of regular appliances.
  • ​Perhaps you once got on a smoothie-making kick, but fell out of it because you didn't like washing the blender. If so, then you might like Millo. It's a smoothie-specific blender that's less of a hassle to wash, plus it's reportedly only a quarter as loud as a regular blender.
  • ​​Perhaps one of the biggest things that people obsess over after leaving their house is, "Did I leave the oven burner on?". Well, if they had the Inirv React system in their kitchen, they could check on their smartphone. If it turned out that a burner was on, they could then remotely turn it off.
  • ​Compost heaps do have some limitations – they take a long time to convert waste to soil, they can attract pests, and you're not supposed to put meat scraps in them. Well, apparently none of those things apply to a new appliance known as the Zera Food Recycler.