Motorcycles

Tarform opens up pre-orders on its handcrafted electric motorcycles

Tarform opens up pre-orders on...
Tarform's electric scrambler and café racer are good-looking machines, but there's scant further detail available other than pricing
Tarform's electric scrambler and café racer are good-looking machines, but there's scant further detail available other than pricing
View 7 Images
Tarform electric scrambler: an elegant design
1/7
Tarform electric scrambler: an elegant design
Tarform's electric scrambler and café racer are good-looking machines, but there's scant further detail available other than pricing
2/7
Tarform's electric scrambler and café racer are good-looking machines, but there's scant further detail available other than pricing
Tarform electric scrambler: circular gated LED headlight
3/7
Tarform electric scrambler: circular gated LED headlight
Tarform electric scrambler: bezeled dash warns of potential threats in traffic using AI-enhanced camera systems
4/7
Tarform electric scrambler: bezeled dash warns of potential threats in traffic using AI-enhanced camera systems
Tarform electric scrambler: aluminum and leather will not be the only surfaces you can order this bike with
5/7
Tarform electric scrambler: aluminum and leather will not be the only surfaces you can order this bike with
Tarform electric scrambler: LED taillight unit
6/7
Tarform electric scrambler: LED taillight unit
Tarform electric scrambler: CNC machined aluminum bars look terrific
7/7
Tarform electric scrambler: CNC machined aluminum bars look terrific
View gallery - 7 images

A Brooklyn-based electric motorcycle startup has just announced itself, with a focus on mixing old-school craftsmanship with a simple electric powertrain and an interesting AI-enhanced spin on rider assistance.

The brainchild of designer Taras Kravtchouk, Tarform threw a party in Brooklyn to celebrate the launch of its first two models – a flat-bar scrambler and a tightly designed café racer. Both bikes are electric, but the company has given out no details on power, range, torque or battery specs, so we've got little to go on at this stage.

What we do know is that they look terrific, echoing many other modern retro designs we've seen recently, with twin shock rear suspension, single seat units and a conspicuous lack of fenders or mirrors that'll likely not survive the journey to production. The creators describe the design approach as "nothing but the essentials."

Tarform electric scrambler: an elegant design
Tarform electric scrambler: an elegant design

Signature design elements include CNC-machined handlebars, what looks like large cooling fans either side of the motor, round LED headlights and tidy LED tails. Indicators are built into the bar ends in a nice touch that's also going to be difficult to wrangle into meeting the highway code.

There's also a nicely bezeled circular high-resolution dash, which allows Tarform to display rider assist information in a novel way. Cameras around the bike feed in through an AI-enhanced system that watches what's happening in traffic and warns the rider of risks, functioning like a basic radar screen to replace the mirrors.

Tarform electric scrambler: bezeled dash warns of potential threats in traffic using AI-enhanced camera systems
Tarform electric scrambler: bezeled dash warns of potential threats in traffic using AI-enhanced camera systems

While that's the extent of the detail that's available to this point, Tarform has opened up pre-orders and announced pricing: US$28,000 for a "Founders Edition" unit to be delivered in 2019, and $18,000 for a "production vehicle" – production of which will begin in late 2019 if all goes according to plan.

Check out a short video from the company below.

Source: Tarform

T A R F O R M / Story

View gallery - 7 images
7 comments
Joshua Tulberg
That front fork/handle bar setup is sweet. As for "radar": It's always amusing to see safety-features being pushed on a motorcycle.
VincentWolf
Impractical seating arrangement. Someone with smarts need to finally make a low slung low rider like the Yamaha Raider or Harley's. Jeeze enough of these stupid street bike racing formats.
usugo
for 28k I will build one by myself, and surely more to my liking
chidrbmt
Between the dark photos & article,one learns next to nothing about this machine. For the rich with too much money anyway. Probably sell in single numbers.
Rustin Lee Haase
With motorcycles, noise is safety. People can hear you coming even when they can't see you. EVs of all types are almost silent like bicycles. That's going to be a problem in urban environments. Anyone who has been snuck up on by someone on a bicycle knows what I'm talking about. I drive an EV car myself and love driving along with the windows down and radio off, taking in the ambient sounds and smells of the landscape. Assuming my motorcycle helmet lets in enough sound, driving along rural highways nearly silently could be a real joy. (until you run into that deer tha neither saw nor heard you coming) You will have to be extra attentive to drive one of these safely.
Marco McClean
Needs fenders. Suppose you ride through a puddle. I remember being 10 and thinking it made my bicycle look cool to take the fenders off, and then you get to school and your pants and the back of your jacket are all muddy.
ljaques
Hmm, butt fugly and way the h*ll overpriced. That means we'll see dentists everywhere driving them, so expect triple digit sales. Har! It will truly be a blessing to hear fewer unmuffled Harleys active. I have to agree on the muddy bum fender design. <shakes head> The turn signals will likely be modified (made visible) before it's allowed on the road, too. There are a couple of Zeros which ride up and down my street. When I'm sitting out in the bushes with the bees buzzing around me, pulling weeds, I can hear the silent motorcycle coming at 50mph from at least 1,500 feet off. Under 25mph, they can still be heard from over 200' off. At speed, their drive train whines. At all speeds, you can hear their tires. No self-effacing deer is going to miss one coming down the road, Rustin. ;) I love the idea of the safety tech, wondering if it will make mainstream soon. Every little bit helps out there. "We had to redesign every part." (in order to justify our pricing model)