Automotive

Tesla unveals AWD 691hp Model S P85D with autopilot and new driver assist systems

The new Tesla Model S P85D will run an AWD setup and put out a whopping 691 hp (515 kW) and 687 lb. ft. (931 Nm) of torque
The new Tesla Model S P85D will run an AWD setup and put out a whopping 691 hp (515 kW) and 687 lb. ft. (931 Nm) of torque
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Acceleration times for the Model D vary from 0–60 mph (96 km/h) 5.7 seconds in the 60D up to an eye watering 3.2 seconds in the P85D
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Acceleration times for the Model D vary from 0–60 mph (96 km/h) 5.7 seconds in the 60D up to an eye watering 3.2 seconds in the P85D
Tesla's new Model D is identical in appearance to the Model S (pictured)
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Tesla's new Model D is identical in appearance to the Model S (pictured)
The P85D with its 691 hp can now make the 0-100 (62 mph) run in only 3.2 seconds (Model S pictured)
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The P85D with its 691 hp can now make the 0-100 (62 mph) run in only 3.2 seconds (Model S pictured)
The rear motor on the top of the line Model S P85D now produces 470 hp, while the front motor brings an additional 221 hp to the table (Model S pictured)
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The rear motor on the top of the line Model S P85D now produces 470 hp, while the front motor brings an additional 221 hp to the table (Model S pictured)
Buyers interested P85D can order one from their local Tesla dealer or online now (Model S pictured)
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Buyers interested P85D can order one from their local Tesla dealer or online now (Model S pictured)
Mileage for the Model D doesn’t suffer significantly, taking only a 10 mile hit on range – down from 285 miles (458 km) to 275 miles (442 km) (Model S pictured)
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Mileage for the Model D doesn’t suffer significantly, taking only a 10 mile hit on range – down from 285 miles (458 km) to 275 miles (442 km) (Model S pictured)
Not exactly autonomous, the new Model D, when asked, will have the ability to park itself in the garage or even come to the owner thanks to the new sensor system (Model S pictured)
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Not exactly autonomous, the new Model D, when asked, will have the ability to park itself in the garage or even come to the owner thanks to the new sensor system (Model S pictured)
The cost of the new Model S P85D is pegged at US$120,000, making it slightly more expensive than the top of the line P85 (Model S pictured)
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The cost of the new Model S P85D is pegged at US$120,000, making it slightly more expensive than the top of the line P85 (Model S pictured)
The Model D also features an autopilot system and lane changing capabilities thanks to 12 sensors mounted around the car
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The Model D also features an autopilot system and lane changing capabilities thanks to 12 sensors mounted around the car
The new Model S P85D features dual electric motors making it all-wheel drive
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The new Model S P85D features dual electric motors making it all-wheel drive
Aside from the D on the end of the P85 badge, there's little to tell the difference between the standard Model S and the new AWD sedan
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Aside from the D on the end of the P85 badge, there's little to tell the difference between the standard Model S and the new AWD sedan
The new Tesla Model S P85D will run an AWD setup and put out a whopping 691 hp (515 kW) and 687 lb. ft. (931 Nm) of torque
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The new Tesla Model S P85D will run an AWD setup and put out a whopping 691 hp (515 kW) and 687 lb. ft. (931 Nm) of torque
The Model S P85D cutaway showing the new front mounted generator
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The Model S P85D cutaway showing the new front mounted generator
The Model S P85D is the fastest and most expensive of the lot but the cheaper, slower models like the 60D and 85D will be available in the new year
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The Model S P85D is the fastest and most expensive of the lot but the cheaper, slower models like the 60D and 85D will be available in the new year

Tesla finally took the wraps off its much rumored Model D at Hawthorn Airport outside of Los Angeles tonight and the results look impressive to say the least. The new S P85D, as it's badged, will run an AWD setup as suspected, and put out a whopping 691 hp (515 kW) and 687 lb. ft. (931 Nm) of torque. It will also feature new driver-assist systems including an auto-pilot solution for self-parking.

The car, identical on the outside to the Model S, now features dual motors, one for each axle. The Model S felt fast enough before as some readers may recall from my test drive last year. Now the house of Elon has upped the already impressive 416 hp (310 kW) to a supercar-fighting 691 hp. That figure is the same as you’ll find in your Lamborghini Aventador owner’s manual. But what the Aventador can’t do, and where the all-electric Tesla excels, is in the important category of torque.

Running a dual motor setup, the rear axle generator in the top of the line P85D now produces 470 hp (350 kW), while the front motor brings an additional 221 hp (165 kW) to the table. So there’s our 691 hp, but about that torque? The new twin engined Model S now generates an island pulling, tree hauling, yacht parking 687 lb. ft of torque. That figure by itself is outrageous, but the fact that all 687 lb. ft. (up from 443 lb. ft/600 Nm) is available to the driver at 0 rpm. Wow. No waiting for pistons to get their pants on or turbos to do their hair, the torque is right there as soon as the launch peddle is depressed.

These figures now give the electric saloon the ability to hit 100 km/h (62 mph) from a standing start in only 3.2 seconds, which is a full 1.2 seconds faster than the Model S P85 and on par with the likes of McLaren, Ferrari and Lamborghini in terms of raw acceleration ability. For those straight line fans, that equates out to a quarter mile run of 11.8 seconds, down from the already quick 12.6 in the P85S.

For the lessor powered models like the 60D and 85D, acceleration times aren't quite as quick. The 60D can make the 0-60 mph (96 km/h) run in a respectable 5.7 seconds, while the 85D is slightly quicker at 5.2. Both cars develop 376 hp, with 188 hp coming from both the front and rear motors. Top speed for the 60D is said to be 125 mph (201 km/h) while the 85D and P85D are rated at 155 mph (250 km/h).

Tesla's new Model D is identical in appearance to the Model S (pictured)
Tesla's new Model D is identical in appearance to the Model S (pictured)

But with the new motor up front, weight concerns are a consideration. Turns out the new system adds only another 291 lb (132 kg) to the car, bringing the D’s totally weight to a not so dainty 4,936 lb (2,239 kg). Tesla spins it to the positive by pointing out that front to rear weight balance is now a perfect 50/50 thanks to the new front motor. The addition of AWD will also help increase the car’s already sticky road-holding manners, plus appeal to more northern Canadian folks like myself where snow and ice are an 8-month a year concern.

Mileage for the Model D also doesn’t suffer significantly, taking only a 10 mile hit on range – down from 285 mi (458 km) to 275 mi (442 km). For the lower powered 85D and 60D models, power drops quite a bit to 376 hp 280 and only 362 lb. ft. (491 Nm) of torque, but then again, for these models pricing drops while mileage range rises. Tesla is also claiming that the car can pull off 1 g of acceleration in its new format, which means bring your neck brace and Velcro driving mitts to the test drive.

The Model S P85D cutaway showing the new front mounted generator
The Model S P85D cutaway showing the new front mounted generator

The other component to the Model D’s unveiling was part of the tease when Tesla first announced the car a few weeks back, and that "other thing" as it turns out, is a new automated parking and driver assist system.

The new driver assist system allows the car to read speed signs and adjust speed accordingly. The system also lets the car not only keep lanes, but also change lanes by itself once the signal is activated thanks to 12 new sensors mounted in critical areas about the car. These systems already exist in some form on similar high-end saloons, but Tesla is set on making its offering the most intuitive and advanced on the market.

While not exactly autonomous, the new Model D will also have the ability to park itself in the garage or even come to the owner thanks to the new sensor system, though there's no details as yet on how far the car will travel or how the system will be activated.

Finally, a new electromechanical braking system has been put in place to help stop the car when required.

Musk noted that every car built in the last two weeks features the new sensor array, while the auto-pilot program will be updated remotely over the next few weeks.

The cost of the new Model S P85D is US$120,000, which as it turns out isn’t that much more than the rear wheel drive S. As of tonight, Tesla has already started taking orders on the Model D, with delivery promised towards year end or in the new year.

Source: Tesla

21 comments
Roomie
Did I miss it or what's the top speed on the S P85D?
Sven Ollino
P85D and 85D both have 155mph (250kmh) top speed. Not mentioned in this article is the fact that 85D and 60D have significantly increased milage over the single motor version. This is all most probaby due to dual regen and different gearing in front and rear motors.
Daishi
I am trying to make sense of various info I have seen online about this/these. it looks like Tesla announced 3 AWD cars, 60D, 85D, and P85D. To quote another source I found "All three new models—the 60D, 85D, and P85D—use the same 188-hp front motor. The 60D and 85D use it on the rear axle as well. The supercar-grade P85D, however, keeps the existing 470-hp motor in back for a monstrous 691-hp / 687 lb-ft combo." Here are the battery ranges for the new models (vs the old ranges) and some other related stats: 60D: 225 miles (vs 215 miles) 85D: 295 miles (vs 285 miles) P85D: 275 miles (vs 285 miles) 0–60 mph Acceleration 60D: 5.7 sec (vs 5.9 sec) 85D: 5.2 sec (vs 5.4 sec) P85D: 3.2 sec (vs 4.2 sec) Quarter Mile Times 60D: 14 sec (vs 14.2 sec) 85D: 13.5 sec (vs 13.7 sec) P85D: 11.8 sec (vs 12.6 sec) Electric Motor Output 60D: 376 hp—188 hp front, 188 hp rear (vs 380 hp rear) 85D: 376 hp—188 hp front, 188 hp rear (vs 380 hp rear) P85D: 691 hp—221 hp front, 470 hp rear (vs 470 hp) Top Speed 60D: 125 mph (vs 120 mph for 60 kWh) 85D: 155 mph (vs 125 mph for 85 kWh) P85D: 155 mph (vs 130 mph for P85) Stats are from road and track
Mark A
Another affordable electric car for the masses.
moreover
If compared to a Mercedes AMG which comes in at around $220.000 for the base model (S65 AMG, 621 horsepower, 0- 60 at 4.2 seconds) it's a bargain! But seriously: Tesla's goal is to bring out the car for the masses in 2017 at around $35k which is near the median price for new car purchases in the US.
Rehab
For the longest time I have felt that high power super cars were so out of touch with reality. All electric is so different and I welcome them with open arms. Fantastic job, bet you can't keep up with orders. Would like to see Tesla develop a simple drop in electric drive system for the back of small front wheel drive cars. This will give us ( those with less cash on hand ) a chance to join in the electric car craze plus all wheel drive "YES"
zevulon
i guess it's obvious that all those lies about a mass market electric car are being forgotten about. tesla is trying to be the next farrari, they will go bankrupt if they attempt to produce let alone mass market a low end electric car. at best, the new battery factory they build will be able to pull a profit by selling batteries to other electric car makers in bulk. there simply isn't enough demand for luxury electric cars for a battery factory to supply profiteably. look up the numbers less than 100,000 electric cars are sold a year globally. and the 'growth rates' are over exaggerated heading into a global economic pullback...
Nicolas Zart
I was there last night and it was interesting. The top speed is 155 MPH. We got an early ride in it and the acceleration was breath taking. I was also with Steve Saleen's R&D SixSixteen on a track a few months ago, and I thought the similarities, yet differences were interesting on both cars. The Model S P85D then went through a mini-course where it recognized a 30 MPH sign and cruised at that speed, followed by a 25 sign where it slowed down to that speed. Finally, after using the left blinker it changed lanes and came to a stop. All in all, a pretty cool evolution of the S with obstacle recognition, even under snow or sand storm and a cool torque play between the front and back under various situations.
Patrick Burton
I'm sorta impressed but not that impresses, my truck has 645 lb-ft, that's at the rear wheels on a dyno, Stock it had 356 at the rear wheels and the factory said it had like 500. The point is that numbers lie and you can't review a car with just the numbers.
TeeWee
I might not get the (stated advertised) performance out of my conventional car, but I can travel farther on a tank of gasoline. I can also fill my tank and be back on the road again in about 5 minutes. How long does it take to fill the fuel tank of this coal burner? I would love to see a test of these cars in Northern states in the wintertime. Such a heavy AWD car should get a good grip on the snow with 4 snow tires but i wonder how the cold will sap the life of the battery pack? Like someone ahead of me suggested, it costs a lot of money.