Tiny Houses

No-frills cabin designed for thrifty downsizers

No-frills cabin designed for t...
The Kabinka comes in four sizes: 12 sq m (130 sq ft), 14.9 sq m (160 sq ft) 17.3 sq m (186 sq ft), and an XL version measuring 20 sq m (215 sq ft), plus a 9.6 sq m (106 sq ft) patio
The Kabinka comes in four sizes: 12 sq m (130 sq ft), 14.9 sq m (160 sq ft) 17.3 sq m (186 sq ft), and an XL version measuring 20 sq m (215 sq ft), plus a 9.6 sq m (106 sq ft) patio
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The Kabinka model pictured is the smallest version available and features a standard tiny house-style bedroom that's accessed by ladder
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The Kabinka model pictured is the smallest version available and features a standard tiny house-style bedroom that's accessed by ladder
The Kabinka has a small living area that can fit a sofa and kitchenette
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The Kabinka has a small living area that can fit a sofa and kitchenette
The Kabinka is mostly made from timber but its exterior has some corrugated metal detailing
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The Kabinka is mostly made from timber but its exterior has some corrugated metal detailing
The Kabinka has an exterior height of 4 m (13 ft)
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The Kabinka has an exterior height of 4 m (13 ft)
The Kabinka is envisioned as a weekend cabin, extra bedroom, or home office
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The Kabinka is envisioned as a weekend cabin, extra bedroom, or home office
The Kabinka comes in four sizes: 12 sq m (130 sq ft), 14.9 sq m (160 sq ft) 17.3 sq m (186 sq ft), and an XL version measuring 20 sq m (215 sq ft), plus a 9.6 sq m (106 sq ft) patio
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The Kabinka comes in four sizes: 12 sq m (130 sq ft), 14.9 sq m (160 sq ft) 17.3 sq m (186 sq ft), and an XL version measuring 20 sq m (215 sq ft), plus a 9.6 sq m (106 sq ft) patio
The Kabinka's glazing includes porthole-style windows
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The Kabinka's glazing includes porthole-style windows
The Kabinka model shown features a small bathroom which is accessed by sliding door
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The Kabinka model shown features a small bathroom which is accessed by sliding door
The Kabinka features a typical tiny house-style bedroom that's reached by ladder
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The Kabinka features a typical tiny house-style bedroom that's reached by ladder
The Kabinka's bedroom area is small but sleeps up to two people
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The Kabinka's bedroom area is small but sleeps up to two people
View gallery - 10 images

Hungarian design collective Hello Wood has created a compact cabin inspired by the tiny house movement. Named Kabinka, the project is intended to serve as a simple and affordable weekend retreat, additional bedroom, or office, and starts at €10,000 (roughly US$12,000).

The Kabinka's cost is definitely low, but not unprecedented, and it's in the same price range as the Magenta DIY tiny house. It's mostly made from wood with sandwich panel insulation, but also has corrugated metal on the exterior. Its glazing includes porthole-style windows and the interior decor is simple and utilitarian.

The tiny cabin comes in four sizes: 12 sq m (130 sq ft), 14.9 sq m (160 sq ft) 17.3 sq m (186 sq ft), and a not-so-tiny "XL" version measuring 20 sq m (215 sq ft) that boasts a 9.6-sq-m (106-sq-ft) patio.

The model shown is the smallest version that Hello Wood sells and has a typical tiny house-style interior layout. The ground floor consists of a living area that can fit a sofa and an optional kitchenette (a wood-burning stove is also optional), with a compact bathroom accessed through a sliding door. The sleeping area is reached by ladder and, like most tiny houses, has very little headroom.

The Kabinka features a typical tiny house-style bedroom that's reached by ladder
The Kabinka features a typical tiny house-style bedroom that's reached by ladder

The Kabinka currently requires construction expertise to assemble and takes a few weeks, but Hello Wood plans to release a flatpack kit version soon, which should speed things up a bit. The company also told us that the team is open to making off-grid options and a trailer for portability available – though such additions will likely increase the price considerably.

It's available for purchase outside of Hungary, though it's not clear if this is extends beyond mainland Europe.

Source: Hello Wood

View gallery - 10 images
6 comments
Spud Murphy
The design makes no sense, the wood frame is on the outside where it's exposed to the elements? More maintenance than it should need, just to be trendy?
HahaDaJoker
Awesome that its cheap. Im guessing it doesnt have electricity or insulation? Too many tiny homes are built for luxury and as much as a regular home
Username
Garden shed.
Johannes
It's simple and attractive. Great to see an external structure, as an alternative to a conventional clad frame, but I hope the timber is appropriately weather-proofed for durability and dimensional stability.
Bill S.
I live in Hungary and I can assure you that living in this thing in the summer, without air conditioning would be brutal. This would make a great tool shed or doll house for the kids. Other than that.....
jerryd
Cut the silly exoframe and widen it to 10' , 3m and you'd have something. Made from insulated panels just connecting the corners well is strong, no need for that silly thing.
And no one sleeps in a loft for long so just design sleeping downstairs and lower the roof, use those materials to make it longer or wider.