Tiny Houses

Copper-clad tiny home opens up like a flower

Copper-clad tiny home opens up...
Australian architectural studio Casey Brown Architecture has recently completed an unusual corrugated copper tiny homeThe unique structure resembles a two-story tower and boasts external sides that open up the home to the outdoors, while doubling as overhead verandas
Australian architectural studio Casey Brown Architecture has recently completed an unusual corrugated copper cabin named Permanent Camping 2
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The cabin features a basic open-space interior inspired from boat building
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The cabin features a basic open-space interior inspired from boat building
The private loft bedroom is enclosed by stunning ironbark woodwork
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The private loft bedroom is enclosed by stunning ironbark woodwork
A second smaller copper-clad tower is incorporated into the home, located to the rear
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A second smaller copper-clad tower is incorporated into the home, located to the rear
The interior is furnished with a wood-burning fireplace, running-water copper basin and hidden underfloor storage
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The interior is furnished with a wood-burning fireplace, running-water copper basin and hidden underfloor storage
Striking copper and ironbark composting toilet
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Striking copper and ironbark composting toilet
Permanent Camping 2 is built with recycled ironbark timber, sourced from an unused wharf float
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Permanent Camping 2 is built with recycled ironbark timber, sourced from an unused wharf float
The dwelling was built to offer its owner a quiet retreat in nature, and space to completely disconnect
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The dwelling was built to offer its owner a quiet retreat in nature, and space to completely disconnect
The two-story tower boasts external sides that open up the home to the outdoors, while doubling as overhead verandas
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The two-story tower boasts external sides that open up the home to the outdoors, while doubling as overhead verandas
Two decks extend the home out to the east and west, greatly increasing the floor space
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Two decks extend the home out to the east and west, greatly increasing the floor space
Permanent Camping 2 has a two-story tower structure
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Permanent Camping 2 has a two-story tower structure
Located amid the lush green hillside of Berry and enjoying views across the Pacific Ocean
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Located amid the lush green hillside of Berry and enjoying views across the Pacific Ocean
Permanent Camping 2 is clad with a corrugated copper skin
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Permanent Camping 2 is clad with a corrugated copper skin
Three exterior sides of the home can be raised and lowered by manual winches, creating overhead shelter from the Sun
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Three exterior sides of the home can be raised and lowered by manual winches, creating overhead shelter from the Sun
The roof can be accessed via the fixed external copper ladder, which also doubles as a lightening conductor
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The roof can be accessed via the fixed external copper ladder, which also doubles as a lightening conductor
The design allows the home to completely close when not in use, protecting the dwelling from the harsh Australian climate
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The design allows the home to completely close when not in use, protecting the dwelling from the harsh Australian climate
Australian architectural studio Casey Brown Architecture has recently completed an unusual corrugated copper tiny homeThe unique structure resembles a two-story tower and boasts external sides that open up the home to the outdoors, while doubling as overhead verandas
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Australian architectural studio Casey Brown Architecture has recently completed an unusual corrugated copper cabin named Permanent Camping 2
Permanent Camping 2 by night
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Permanent Camping 2 by night
View gallery - 17 images

Australian architectural studio Casey Brown Architecture has recently completed an unusual corrugated copper tiny home, located two hours south of Sydney. Permanent Camping 2 has a two-story tower structure, and boasts external sides that open up the home to the outdoors, while doubling as overhead verandas. The design allows the home to completely close when not in use, while also protecting the dwelling from the harsh Australian climate, including gale force winds, bushfires, driving rain and the occasional interest from large bulls.

“The design is based on the flower concept, a building that opens up its sides when in use like a flower by day, and closes down its sides when not in use just like a flower at night,” Rob Brown, lead project architect from Casey Brown Architecture, tells New Atlas.

The two-story tower boasts external sides that open up the home to the outdoors, while doubling as overhead verandas
The two-story tower boasts external sides that open up the home to the outdoors, while doubling as overhead verandas

Located amid the lush green hills of Berry in New South Wales, and enjoying views across the Pacific Ocean, the dwelling was built to offer its owner a quiet retreat in nature, and space to completely disconnect. The hut is accessible only by foot and is a remodeled version of a previous Permanent Camping structure built by Jeffery Broadfield in Mudgee.

Permanent Camping 2 is built with recycled ironbark timber sourced from an unused wharf float, and clad with a corrugated copper skin. The use of copper was chosen for its aesthetic appeal and ability to protect the exposed timbers of the home, ensuring material longevity. Three exterior sides of the home can be raised and lowered by manual winches, creating overhead shelter from the Sun. Furthermore, two decks extend the home out to the east and west, greatly increasing the floor space from the original 9 sq m (97 sq ft) lower-level interior.

The interior is furnished with a wood-burning fireplace, running-water copper basin and hidden underfloor storage
The interior is furnished with a wood-burning fireplace, running-water copper basin and hidden underfloor storage

The primary two-story tower features 3 x 3-m (9.8 x 9.8-ft) floor plate and measures 6 m (19.7 ft) tall. The cabin features a basic open space interior inspired by boat building and is furnished with a wood-burning fireplace, small bench with cooking burner, running-water copper basin, open shelves and hidden underfloor storage.

The private loft bedroom is located above the living space, accessed by a timber ladder and enclosed by stunning ironbark woodwork. A second smaller copper-clad tower is incorporated into the home, and is located to the rear. It houses a composting toilet, shower and gravity fed water tank above.

Permanent Camping 2 is built with recycled ironbark timber, sourced from an unused wharf float
Permanent Camping 2 is built with recycled ironbark timber, sourced from an unused wharf float

The roof is fitted with photovoltaic panels, to meet the home’s electricity requirements, and a water collection system. It can be accessed via the fixed external copper ladder, which also doubles as a lightening conductor.

Permanent Camping 2 was constructed on the property by Jeffery Broadfield in an onsite workshop, presenting the building is a master class in timber and copper craftmanship.

Source: Casey Brown Architecture

View gallery - 17 images
8 comments
8 comments
Nelson Hyde Chick
Wouldn't this house just be one huge sweatbox on a hard day? Didn't they used to put misbehaving prisoners in small tin boxes like this as punishment?
Spud Murphy
This is a terrible use of a high value metal like copper.
BlueOak
Love the idea of the open and yet sheltered first floor with the sleeping safely up above. And as well, separating but locating next to the main cabin, the shower/toilet tower.

But that second floor seems like it could benefit from more windows (with similar sheltering hatches) and ventilation.
wolf0579
Great idea for protection from Yowies in "disputed" territory.

Substitute a thicker cheap corrugated metal and you've got something here!
wolf0579
The use of copper was an ugly gesture. The studio was stroking it's own collective ego. I'm sure those designers know how valuable copper has become. It's too useful to be wasted like this.

On the up-side for whoever lives here at the time of an intense solar storm, and resulting EMP, their electronics that happen to be inside, if the walls are all down, should be fine! Everything not shielded will be burned out.
Imran Sheikh
Bad material choice for a good design. Its more of a big solar cooker than a tiny house, because of external metal use.
riczero-b
NeoBrutalist garbage.
WB
this is the usual resource wasting garbage hipster kambucha sipping architects put out with total disregard for responsible resource usage