Architecture

Oregon man thrashes local children in treehouse-building contest

Oregon man thrashes local chil...
Roy Wilkinson must have the coolest house on the block.
Roy Wilkinson must have the coolest house on the block.
View 11 Images
Roy Wilkinson must have the coolest house on the block.
1/11
Roy Wilkinson must have the coolest house on the block.
Roy Wilkinson must have the coolest house on the block.
2/11
Roy Wilkinson must have the coolest house on the block.
Roy Wilkinson must have the coolest house on the block.
3/11
Roy Wilkinson must have the coolest house on the block.
Roy Wilkinson must have the coolest house on the block.
4/11
Roy Wilkinson must have the coolest house on the block.
Roy Wilkinson must have the coolest house on the block.
5/11
Roy Wilkinson must have the coolest house on the block.
Roy Wilkinson must have the coolest house on the block.
6/11
Roy Wilkinson must have the coolest house on the block.
Roy Wilkinson must have the coolest house on the block.
7/11
Roy Wilkinson must have the coolest house on the block.
Roy Wilkinson must have the coolest house on the block.
8/11
Roy Wilkinson must have the coolest house on the block.
Roy Wilkinson must have the coolest house on the block.
9/11
Roy Wilkinson must have the coolest house on the block.
Roy Wilkinson must have the coolest house on the block.
10/11
Roy Wilkinson must have the coolest house on the block.
Roy Wilkinson must have the coolest house on the block.
11/11
Roy Wilkinson must have the coolest house on the block.

Everyone loves a treehouse - they seem to inspire a universal feeling of childlike wonder, and done right they really tickle the old 'living in harmony with nature' glands too. We've covered some beauties over the years here at Gizmag, but this one has to be the grand-daddy of them all. The work of architect Robert Harvey Oshatz, the Wilkinson Residence makes use of a steeply sloped block to put the house's main level right up in the tree canopy. Stunning from every angle, it uses curves and waves to echo the owner's love of the natural landscape with a slightly musical theme.

What a magical home! Roy Wilkinson's treehouse home in Portland, Oregon does such a great job of blending the natural with the designed that it manages not to feel contrived, despite the wild shapes and angles Oshatz has used.

Privacy is maintained by the use of a curved wall on the side that faces the road, while the rear-facing side is entirely glassed over, producing a wonderful feeling of floating among the treetops. The rear decking opens right out among the trees, at least 10 or 15 metres up off the ground... Me, I'd be putting in a series of Tarzan ropes to get down to the shops.

Awesome stuff - get into the photo gallery to see more!

From Robert Harvey Oshatz (whose website highlights a whole bunch of amazing works), via Twisted Sifter.

12 comments
Jamie_S
Excuse my ignorance but doesn\'t a tree house usually have part of its structure supported by and built around or amongst branches an actual living tree? From what I can see in the pictures this \"tree house\" does not. Nice design, up in the tree canopy but we cannot truly call it a \"tree house\"???
Christopher Wendel
Jamie - I agree - beautiful home but NOT a \"tree house\"
Facebook User
Beautiful house- soft curves throughout which would have been a builders nightmare, but well executed design that fits well into nature. Not a tree house, but quite an exotic home for sure.
Mestengo
Great looking house that blends into its environment beautifully. But! Only a moron who lives in a desert would call this a \"tree house\".
Anna Fisher
AWESOME, thanks for posting!
mrhuckfin
I used to live just up the road from where this guy lives! I\'m wondering when he built this place? He couldn\'t have picked a better place to put it. :-)
Reuben Richardson
Agree. not a treehouse.
bas
Why should one thrash children in order to build a house? And why use copper instead of something less polluting in a design that is meant to blend into the environment?
Lazy Leafson
A real treehouse has a tree in the inside of it. See: http://FineTreehouseBuilding.com
rashed
The figure is calculated according to three factors: private grazing land lease rates, beef cattle prices and the cost of livestock production. In effect, the fee rises, falls or stays the same based on market conditions, with livestock operators paying more when conditions are better and less when conditions have declined. you can visit the website for more detail information about Oregon Home Builders