Architecture

Could you live in a ventilation shaft?

Could you live in a ventilatio...
Three separate installations were constructed in Beijing, Shanghai, and Hong kong stores
Three separate installations were constructed in Beijing, Shanghai, and Hong kong stores
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China's People's Architecture Office (PAO) has a knack for designing thought-provoking – if impractical – housing ideas
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China's People's Architecture Office (PAO) has a knack for designing thought-provoking – if impractical – housing ideas
Three separate installations were constructed in Beijing, Shanghai, and Hong kong stores
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Three separate installations were constructed in Beijing, Shanghai, and Hong kong stores
Tubular Living was commissioned by the Lane Crawford department store to celebrate 165 years of operation
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Tubular Living was commissioned by the Lane Crawford department store to celebrate 165 years of operation
PAO says that the tubular homes could be easily manufactured with standardized factory methods
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PAO says that the tubular homes could be easily manufactured with standardized factory methods
The installations would probably be technically habitable, since they can be outfitted with staircases and separate rooms like bedrooms and lounge
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The installations would probably be technically habitable, since they can be outfitted with staircases and separate rooms like bedrooms and lounge
Three separate installations were constructed in Beijing, Shanghai, and Hong kong stores
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Three separate installations were constructed in Beijing, Shanghai, and Hong kong stores
The units created include staircases and dining furniture
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The units created include staircases and dining furniture
Tubular Living was commissioned by the Lane Crawford department store to celebrate 165 years of operation
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Tubular Living was commissioned by the Lane Crawford department store to celebrate 165 years of operation
Perhaps the ventilation shafts could be used to create a micro-living community reminiscent of Tokyo's famous Capsule Hotels
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Perhaps the ventilation shafts could be used to create a micro-living community reminiscent of Tokyo's famous Capsule Hotels
The tubes include furniture and staircases
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The tubes include furniture and staircases
The tubular homes include staircases and dining furniture
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The tubular homes include staircases and dining furniture
The project is pretty out there and definitely not one for the claustrophobic
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The project is pretty out there and definitely not one for the claustrophobic
The tubular homes include staircases and dining furniture
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The tubular homes include staircases and dining furniture
Perhaps the ventilation shafts could be used to create a micro-living community reminiscent of Tokyo's famous Capsule Hotels
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Perhaps the ventilation shafts could be used to create a micro-living community reminiscent of Tokyo's famous Capsule Hotels
PAO says that the tubular homes could be easily manufactured with standardized factory methods
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PAO says that the tubular homes could be easily manufactured with standardized factory methods
Architectural drawing of Tubular Living
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Architectural drawing of Tubular Living
Architectural drawing of Tubular Living
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Architectural drawing of Tubular Living
Architectural drawing of Tubular Living
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Architectural drawing of Tubular Living

People's Architecture Office (PAO) has a knack for designing thought-provoking – if impractical – housing ideas. The Chinese firm's latest project, Tubular Living, is probably its wackiest yet and suggests that people make their home in large metal ventilation shafts.

Though Tubular Living could be seen as a dystopian vision of living in over-crowded cities, it shouldn't be taken too seriously. The project was commissioned by the Lane Crawford retail company to celebrate 165 years of operation, and three different installations were constructed in Beijing, Shanghai, and Hong kong department stores last year.

PAO says that its tubular micro-housing could be easily manufactured with standardized factory methods. The units created include staircases and dining furniture, though whether or not anyone would want to actually live in one is another question – we'd guess that you'd feel like a human sardine, and would be driven to distraction by the inevitable amplified snoring at night from neighboring units.

Tubular Living was commissioned by the Lane Crawford department store to celebrate 165 years of operation
Tubular Living was commissioned by the Lane Crawford department store to celebrate 165 years of operation

It's not totally clear from PAO's proposal, but rather than expect people to move into existing ventilation shafts and get blasted with cold air, we're assuming that the firm envisions filling a large space, such as a warehouse for example, with a network of these tubes, to create a micro-living community of sorts.

Either way, this one is best taken as food-for-thought.

Source: PAO via Design Boom

3 comments
bobcat4424
the Japanese call this sort of thing "chindogu." From Japanese, literarally " accessory of a weird way". It is a totally useless invention that seems to be " useful" but in reality it isn't. They are usually done as an art form.
Douglas Bennett Rogers
If it can support soil pressure, It might be good for tornado shelter/underground housing. Rooms should consist of vertical pipe with end caps. Upper end could be skylight. Double wall plastic sewer pipe would be bettet for this.
dsiple
This could be the worlds worst spreader of viruses and bacterial infections - ever. I'm going to pass on this one..