Urban Transport

Cake goes to work on electric utility moto

Cake goes to work on electric ...
The Ösa utility e-moto can be molded into over a thousand different configurations
The Ösa utility e-moto can be molded into over a thousand different configurations
View 10 Images
The Ösa utility e-bike has been designed as a workbench on wheels
1/10
The Ösa utility e-bike has been designed as a workbench on wheels
The Ösa rides on 15-inch aluminum rims wrapped in sport tires
2/10
The Ösa rides on 15-inch aluminum rims wrapped in sport tires
The boxy Li-ion battery bank mounted on the aluminum frame can serve as a mobile power bank for tools and gadgets
3/10
The boxy Li-ion battery bank mounted on the aluminum frame can serve as a mobile power bank for tools and gadgets
The headlight can be removed from the mount and used as a spot
4/10
The headlight can be removed from the mount and used as a spot
The Ösa features a 10 kW drivetrain
5/10
The Ösa features a 10 kW peak drivetrain
Central to its utility is the uni-bar, on which can be mounted various accessories
6/10
Central to its utility is the uni-bar, on which can be mounted various accessories
The belt-drivetrain has been developed in collaboration with Gates
7/10
The belt-drivetrain has been developed in collaboration with Gates
The Ösa is available as a Lite version, or the Plus model shown here
8/10
The Ösa is available as a Lite version, or the Plus model shown here
The Ösa is offered with a choice of two battery options, Lean for shorter per charge range and Long for more miles before having to plug in
9/10
The Ösa is offered with a choice of two battery options, Lean for shorter per charge range and Long for more miles before having to plug in
The Ösa utility e-moto can be molded into over a thousand different configurations
10/10
The Ösa utility e-moto can be molded into over a thousand different configurations

Where Cake's first e-motorcycle was an off-roader, which was then modified for the streets, the Swedish bike maker's latest offering is a bit of a Jack of all trades. The Ösa electric moto can serve as a mobile workbench for builders, a rideable shopping cart for busy parents, or even a live music platform on wheels.

"To avoid an environmental meltdown, there is an obligation to change that is shared by everyone," said Cake CEO Stefan Ytterborn. "Transportation is one of the more evident changes. We’re seeing combustion vehicles being replaced by electric, gasoline and diesel are being banned, and cars will soon be excluded from the urban landscape. The Ösa is our next offering – it provides a viable platform for that change as it so capably meets the diverse needs and priorities of our customers."

The Ösa utility e-bike has been designed as a workbench on wheels
The Ösa utility e-bike has been designed as a workbench on wheels

Running through the center of the design is a long gray bar that runs from the handlebars to beyond the seat. Riders can clamp on various accessories to this uni-bar, to add baskets, bags, tools and more. Cake says that over a thousand different configurations can be created. Examples in the Cake image library include a photographer able to take along everything needed in one go, a farmer transporting veggies to market, a postie hauling packages as well as letters, and a crafter using Ösa as a mobile workbench (pictured above).

Two models are being offered, the Lite and the Plus. The Lite can be thought of as a moped (L1e-b in Europe, motor-driven cycle in the US) and tips the scales at 65 kg (143 lb). Its 10 kW peak drivetrain will be able to get up to 30 mph (45 km/h), with two Li-ion battery options available. The Lean battery offers 47 miles (75 km) per charge, while the Long unit can manage 75 miles (120 km).

The utility e-moto features a 6061 aluminum frame and a 7050 handlebar with a high contrast TFT display for trip info. It has an unloaded seat height of 800 mm (31.5 in), and a ground clearance of 220 mm (8.6 in). There's 100 mm (3.9 in) of travel to the front suspension and 260 mm at the back, and the 15-inch rims are wrapped in sport tires.

This flavor is priced at €4,500 (just under US$5k), with shipping expected to start in March 2020.

The Ösa is available as a Lite version, or the Plus model shown here
The Ösa is available as a Lite version, or the Plus model shown here

The Ösa Plus model is classed as a motorcycle (L3e-A1 in Europe and motorcycle in the US). Riders can get up to 62 mph (100 km/h), with the Lean battery option offering a per charge range of 37 miles (60 km) and the Long battery giving 63 miles (100 km) per charge. The Plus comes with the option of an external DC-AC inverter to power whatever tools the rider needs.

Elsewhere, this model is similar to the Lite – though front and rear suspension have more travel. The Ösa Plus is priced at €6,500 (just over US$7k) and is also expected to ship in March next year. The video below has more.

The Ösa

Source: Cake

3 comments
roddy6667
How many times could a person use a taxi or Uber with the $5000 that this toy costs?
Signguy
Yeah, how do they justify 7 grand for this minimal bike?
yermadaho
Since you asked roddy... I'll be using published rates for Phoenix and assuming $5K for the Lite with the small battery at 47 miles range. A 47 mile taxi ride would be about $106 so about 47 rides. An Uber runs about $73 so about 68 rides. Not that many, really. Additionally, the batteries are good for 800-1000 cycles when properly treated. At the low end, that's 34,000 more miles. If you were to taxi and Uber that distance the cost would be $74,800 and $51,000, respectively. Any more questions? Not sure how they're toys since both models would need registration and insurance in most US jurisdictions. If you're just looking to nitpick over vehicle choices, share what you drive and I'll tell you what's wrong with it. signguy, a large portion of the cost is in the battery. They don't say which specific ones they use, but the 21700 cells they're listing range from $6-13 retail, depending on capacity and discharge rate. Remember we're talking upward of 200 cells per battery. Granted, they probably don't pay retail but there's assembly and profit to be accounted for as well. Plus there are motorcycle parts, contributing to the higher cost.