Urban Transport

D-Fly aims for premium riders with Dragonfly Hyperscooter

D-Fly aims for premium riders ...
The Dragonfly Hyperscooter is available in three-wheel and four-wheel variants
The Dragonfly Hyperscooter is available in three-wheel and four-wheel variants
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The four-wheeled version of the Dragonfly Hyperscooter comes with the option to add off-road tires
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The four-wheeled version of the Dragonfly Hyperscooter comes with the option to add off-road tires
The Dragonfly Hyperscooter comes with front and rear LED lights, and turn indicators
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The Dragonfly Hyperscooter comes with front and rear LED lights, and turn indicators
When folded upright in sleep mode, the alarm is automatically armed
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When folded upright in sleep mode, the alarm is automatically armed
A 4.5-inch 4K display sits atop the steering column
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A 4.5-inch 4K display sits atop the steering column
The Dragonfly Hyperscooter is available in three-wheel and four-wheel variants
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The Dragonfly Hyperscooter is available in three-wheel and four-wheel variants
The Dragonfly Hyperscooter includes a 3-gal storage unit – including a bottle holder
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The Dragonfly Hyperscooter includes a 3-gal storage unit – including a bottle holder
The Dragonfly Hyperscooter has a top speed of 38 mph, and a per charge range of up to 28.5 miles
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The Dragonfly Hyperscooter has a top speed of 38 mph, and a per charge range of up to 28.5 miles
The Dragonfly is billed as the world's first hyperscooter
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The Dragonfly is billed as the world's first hyperscooter
View gallery - 8 images

In the automotive world, a hypercar describes a performance monster that usually comes with a scary price tag. London's D-Fly has borrowed and tweaked the term for the release of its Dragonfly electric kickscooter, billed as the world's first hyperscooter.

Electric kickscooters are a common sight in large towns and cities these days, and we've seen quite a few performance-centric beasts pop up recently, including the eMove Cruiser and the C60. But the Dragonfly has been designed to be in a class of its own in terms of performance, build quality, and up-to-the-minute technology. Not to mention it's eye-wateringly high cost.

The Dragonfly is billed as the world's first hyperscooter
The Dragonfly is billed as the world's first hyperscooter

D-Fly says that its striking design will "evoke the look and feel of a supercar or luxury sedan" thanks to a frame made from carbon fiber, aerospace-grade aluminum and carbon-fiber-reinforced paulownia wood.

"At D-Fly Group, we knew it would take something radically different to really push the needle on mobility," said company founder Jez Williman. "The Dragonfly Hyperscooter is the urban-mobility equivalent to the supercar, and we’re very proud of that. The future’s arrived in style."

The Dragonfly is being made available as three-wheel and four-wheel models. The former is 42.7 inches (108.6 cm) long, and when the steering column is folded out to ride-ready, the Dragonfly is 41.8 inches (106.2 cm) high. The four-wheeled model has a longer deck (at 45.3 in/115.2 cm long), improved turning radius, and the option to add off-road tires. And if you buy a three-wheeler but want to move to four, you can purchase the longer deck and rear wheel/suspension block as accessories.

The four-wheeled version of the Dragonfly Hyperscooter comes with the option to add off-road tires
The four-wheeled version of the Dragonfly Hyperscooter comes with the option to add off-road tires

Either way, the hyperscooter features dual front motors that deliver 1,800 watts to each wheel, for a high torque sprint up to a top speed of 38 mph (61 km/h). Surge, Dart, Glide and Hover ride modes are available, and inclines of up to 28 percent can be tackled. The standard removable battery pack should be good for up to 11 miles (18 km) between top-ups, while a long range unit should be able to stay away from the charger for up to 28.5 mi (46 km). KERS regen braking may eke out a little more range, while also helping the rear stomp brake to bring the hyperscooter to a stop. D-Fly will be selling battery packs on their own, so you can carry a spare in your backpack and swap out when needed.

The luxury electric kickscooter has LED head- and tail-lights and turn indicators, and riders will need both a physical key and a unique RFID fob to get rolling. Other security measures include automatic arming of the alarm when folded up in sleep mode, geofencing and GPS tracking.

D-Fly has also included something called Full-Tilt Technology for three-dimensional tilt and twist steering controlled by a rotary throttle. Dual-wishbone independent suspension system and foam-filled, no-puncture tires help smooth out the bumps.

The Dragonfly Hyperscooter includes a 3-gal storage unit – including a bottle holder
The Dragonfly Hyperscooter includes a 3-gal storage unit – including a bottle holder

The Dragonfly is home to a 4.5-inch 4K display, there's turn-by-turn navigation with a Bluetooth-paired smartphone, and the wirelessly-connected phone can also be used to stream tunes through the onboard sound system. And the ride rocks its own drive sounds, too, so that pedestrians and other road users can hear you coming.

Elsewhere, the hyperscooter includes a 3-gal (11.4-L) storage unit – including a bottle holder – and the steering column has integrated pockets to hold necessities.

The three-wheeled variant of the Dragonfly carries a hefty price tag of US$4,999, while the four-wheeled model adds a thousand bucks to the ticket price. The launch editions are up for pre-order now, with shipping slated for mid-2020.

Source: D-Fly

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3 comments
guzmanchinky
I have 4 electric skateboards and an electric scooter, I have what I would call a comfortable amount of funds, and yet I could not ever see spending this kind of money on something like this. I would think a Boosted Rev scooter would be more than enough for 1/4 the cost...
Thud
Anyone who rides a board will tell you that if you come off a board you have to turn into a runner instantly to stay on your feet and not hit the ground. Once you learn that you're a thousand time safer on a board. Putting a fairing in front of the rider is a no go for safety. No way to recover if you come off. Big barrier between your feet and the ground.
eirobotix
Some of this powerful scooters make motorcycling look safe... (I'm a 20 year career superbike rider before anyone gets triggered)

All that drive & grip from a platform completely underneath you with the rider having such a high CofG directly above & little mechanism to shift body weight to counter acceleration forces effectively seems mental to me - the E-skateboards are even more ridiculous in this regard.

Seems like a good way to injure yourself but hey to each their own. Then there's the price....