Urban Transport

Finnish-built Kinner velomobile is like a human-powered classic car

Finnish-built Kinner velomobil...
The Kinner velomobile should sell for €15,000 (about $17,448)
The Kinner velomobile should sell for €15,000 (about $17,448)
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The Kinner velomobile should sell for €15,000 (about $17,448)
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The Kinner velomobile should sell for €15,000 (about $17,448)
The Kinner features an under-the-hood cargo storage space
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The Kinner features an under-the-hood cargo storage space
The current Kinner prototype is 285 cm long (112 in), 100 cm wide (39 in) and has a 220-cm (87-in) wheelbase, allowing it to be legally classified as an electrically assisted bicycle – in Finland, at least
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The current Kinner prototype is 285 cm long (112 in), 100 cm wide (39 in) and has a 220-cm (87-in) wheelbase, allowing it to be legally classified as an electrically assisted bicycle – in Finland, at least
The Kinner's total weight hasn't been divulged just yet, as Luomaranta is still deciding on what sort of electric-assist motor will be used on the production version
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The Kinner's total weight hasn't been divulged just yet, as Luomaranta is still deciding on what sort of electric-assist motor will be used on the production version
The Kinner features two padded bucket seats
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The Kinner features two padded bucket seats
The production version of the Kinner will feature an anti-theft system
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The production version of the Kinner will feature an anti-theft system
All of the composite parts of the production Kinner will be made of fiberglass, carbon fiber, or a "green bio-based" material
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All of the composite parts of the production Kinner will be made of fiberglass, carbon fiber, or a "green bio-based" material
A close look at the Kinner prototype's rear LED lighting
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A close look at the Kinner prototype's rear LED lighting
View gallery - 8 images

We've told you about quite a few velomobiles over the years, some more polished and professional-looking than others. The two-seater four-wheeled Kinner is certainly one of the most exquisite we've seen so far.

Created by Finnish guitar-builder and classic-vehicle-restorer Ari Jukka Luomaranta, the Kinner takes its name from the Finnish term Kinneri, which was used to describe velomobiles in the 1940s. For those of you who are unfamiliar with the vehicles, they're essentially recumbent trikes – or in some cases quadricycles – that enclose the rider within an aerodynamic body.

The current prototype is 285 cm long (112 in), 100 cm wide (39 in) and has a 220-cm (87-in) wheelbase, allowing it to be legally classified as an electrically assisted bicycle – in Finland, at least. Among other things, it sports lightweight fast-rolling road bike wheels; a composite chassis with a hinged forward-opening hood for easy access; padded bucket seats; and an airplane-style steering yoke.

The production version of the Kinner will feature an anti-theft system
The production version of the Kinner will feature an anti-theft system

Its total weight hasn't been divulged just yet, as Luomaranta is still deciding on what sort of electric-assist motor will be used on the production version. He envisions that motor being utilized mainly to get the vehicle up to cruising speed, at which point the rider(s) could switch entirely to human power if desired. For that matter, he may also offer a non-motorized version.

Other planned features of the production model include an integrated electronics system with a PIN-code-activated anti-theft function; the ability to swap in more robust gravel bike wheels; plus optional side windows, mirrors and a full LED lighting system. All of the composite parts will be made of fiberglass, carbon fiber or a "green bio-based" material.

Luomaranta is currently accepting €500 (about US$582) reservation deposits, which will go toward the planned €15,000 ($17,448) price tag. He's hoping to begin delivering velomobiles to clients next April.

You can see the Kinner prototype in action, in the following video.

Kinner four-wheeled two-seater velomobile

Source: Kinner via Recumbent News

View gallery - 8 images
8 comments
8 comments
DavidCPovenski
Orca!
BlueOak
Cool stuff. But not so sure about that almost car-sized price of $17,500. Demonstrates the cost challenges of job-shop limited production products.
drhall
Pricing “human powered” anything (wait… electric assist to go over 45 mph, gold plated pedals or fed rebate for $15k ???) but for $17k, these products are just not gonna happen.
No market, no infrastructure and no real save the world (CO2 happens).
I feel it better time and effort to promote open matrix asphalt/concrete or land smothering goop!
clay
Ridiculously expensive but man, what a beautiful ride! I'd actually get some exercise on my way to the pub!
jerryd
Like it'll ever get pedaled other than helping starting up.
Lamar Havard
I paid $18,000 for a new Scion IQ in 2012, and am still driving it...so, pass.
Gerry Lavell
Why are mirrors optional? They should be compulsory. As a motorcyclist, with the ability to stay with the traffic and largely not be vulnerable to vehicles approaching from behind, rearview mirrors are compulsory. HPV's, and that includes bicycles (they are legally a vehicle in nay places), should be required to have mirrors; oh. and electric scooters and anything else with wheels that travels on the road (maybe difficult for one wheeled vehicles, though - sunglasses with mirrors?).
Adrian Akau
It is for rich people with large estates. The drivers in my area drive dangerously.