Urban Transport

Autonomous REE Leopard may soon be making deliveries to your home

Autonomous REE Leopard may soo...
The REE Leopard EV is designed for making autonomous last-mile deliveries
The REE Leopard EV is designed for making autonomous last-mile deliveries
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Although being marketed primarily with cargo in mind, the REE Leopard could also transport passengers
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Although being marketed primarily with cargo in mind, the REE Leopard could also transport passengers
The REE platform, upon which the Leopard body is mounted
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The REE platform, upon which the Leopard body is mounted
The REE Leopard EV is designed for making autonomous last-mile deliveries
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The REE Leopard EV is designed for making autonomous last-mile deliveries
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Although we hear a lot about the development of urban aerial delivery drones, it's quite likely that autonomous ground-based delivery vehicles will be in wide use first. REE Automotive's Leopard EV is one example, and it's just been unveiled as a physical concept vehicle.

The rear-wheel-drive Leopard is based on REE's existing modular platform, in which different purpose-specific bodies can be swapped on and off of a flat "skateboard"-type chassis.

That chassis contains the batteries, along with "REEcorner" units (one at each wheel) which incorporate all the steering, suspension, motor, gearbox and braking components. Because there's no direct mechanical connection between the body and those units, they are instead electronically controlled from the body via drive-by-wire technology.

The REE platform, upon which the Leopard body is mounted
The REE platform, upon which the Leopard body is mounted

The Leopard itself is 3.4 meters long by 1.4 m wide (11.2 by 4.6 ft), has a cargo capacity of 180 cubic feet (5 cubic meters), a gross vehicle weight rating of 2 tonnes (2.2 tons), a 50-kWh battery capacity, and a top speed of 60 mph (96.5 km/h). It additionally features a low, flat floor, allowing it to carry more cargo than would otherwise be possible.

It's designed for last-mile deliveries, wherein items are transported from a central hub such as a warehouse to customers' homes. The vehicle finds its way around city streets via GPS and onboard sensors including LiDAR modules. There's no word on its battery range.

Should you be interested in seeing the REE Leopard for yourself, it will be on display at CES 2022 in January. The video below has more.

Unveiling Leopard - autonomous last-mile delivery concept vehicle Powered by REE!

Source: REE Automotive

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7 comments
7 comments
Bob809
I am sure in the not so far future these things will be clogging the roads. However, I see an awful lot of other issues with them to with security, like someone being inside and SURPRISE! Maybe I just see the worst in Humanity, or is it just the way things are these days?
michael_dowling
This is better than diesel powered trucks with human drivers,but a much better system,which became obsolete with the development of trucks,is overdue for a comeback: https://www.lowtechmagazine.com/2008/02/a-world-without.html You could order something online,and have it delivered to your basement in the morning.
CraigAllenCorson
I really hope that manufacturers will have the foresight to equip their autonomous vehicles with emergency stops that police can access via radio signal. Things can and do go break down, and if one of these should run amok on city streets, the manufacturer would be liable for any deaths/damage/injuries.
Aross
All well and good to be autonomous, but who or what is going to deliver the packages from the curb to my door. We are living in a time when most households have 2 people working so, unless they work from home, there is no one to receive the package. I guess that this is to mimic the current delivery trend where packages are dropped at the door without any indication, like ringing the door bell or knocking, that it was delivered. Opens everything up to theft.
foxpup
Potentially usefull product, HORRIBLE name. Why would anyone chose a company name that reminds people of getting screamed at??!!
Nelson Hyde Chick
Technology gives one man the abilities of a thousand men, and then it burdens the Earth with the thousand men it just made obsolete.

Many among us are suffering from what I call the TED Syndrome, named after the famous talks, which is the belief all our problems can be fixed with technology; and sadly all our problems cannot be solved with technology because technology just creates new problems when it sort of fixes a problem
ljaques
Oh, what a CUTE toaster! ;)
I have a feeling that these are going to become quite common in the next decades.
I wonder how much the skateboard costs...