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Yomee lets you be master of your yogurt

Yomee lets you be master of yo...
Yomee may be a yogurt maker, but the process isn't instant – it takes six hours
Yomee may be a yogurt maker, but the process isn't instant – it takes six hours
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Yomee includes a lid that toppings can be stored in
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Yomee includes a lid that toppings can be stored in
Yomee may be a yogurt maker, but the process isn't instant – it takes six hours
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Yomee may be a yogurt maker, but the process isn't instant – it takes six hours

Yogurt is one of those foods that's good for you in theory, although in practise it can contain a lot of sugar and fat. That's why Lecker Labs created Yomee. Billed as "the world's first automatic yogurt maker," it allows you to control the sweetener and type of milk, plus it's reportedly much cheaper than buying individual containers of prepared yogurt.

Here's how it works …

You start by pouring in a milk of your choice – which can include non-dairy varieties – and placing a culture-filled Yomee pod in the machine.

The milk is boiled and stirred for 15 minutes, after which it's cooled down to 115°F (46°C). The pod is then dropped into the milk, where it dissolves and releases the live bacterial cultures. After a bit more stirring, the mixture is left to incubate for six hours. During this period, the milk is transformed to yogurt.

Finally, it's cooled to 50°F (10°C), which slows down the culturing process. It can then remain chilled for 48 hours before being consumed.

Yomee includes a lid that toppings can be stored in
Yomee includes a lid that toppings can be stored in

Each pod makes two servings of yogurt (a total of 10 oz/283 g), and can be kept for up to six months before being used. The pods also contain natural flavoring, and come in plain, strawberry, vanilla and blueberry varieties. You add your own sweetener, along with any actual fruit that you might want in there.

Additionally, during the yogurt-making process, an iOS/Android app is used to stipulate what type of yogurt you want the device to make – choices include Greek, plain or stirred.

Yomee is currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign, where a pledge of US$99 is required to get one. If it reaches production, the retail price will be $149. The pods should sell for $9.90 for a pack of 10 (or 20 servings). According to Lecker Labs, each serving should cost the user about one third what they would pay for a container of store-bought yogurt.

There's more information in the following video.

Source: Kickstarter

Yomee - Makes yogurt just for you, 5 times cheaper & healthier

2 comments
biz boy
Dannon yogurt costs $2.78 for 32oz. at WalMart This costs $3 for 3 pods that make 30oz, not counting the milk, hassle of washing and storing, up front costs, etc. Not a good deal.
AladdinConnolly
Yeah they seriously overestimated the amount yogurt costs at the store. This is the kind of concept that I have been burned with kickstarter before, but if it actually ends up in production I would consider it at $149, if it works for almond milk.