Architecture

There's more to this Zaha Hadid-designed billboard than meets the eye

To the front, the Kensington billboard displays adverts to London drivers, while pedestrians at the rear get to enjoy Zaha Hadid's signature design language
To the front, the Kensington billboard displays adverts to London drivers, while pedestrians at the rear get to enjoy Zaha Hadid's signature design language
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Whether designing a skyscraper or a toilet, Zaha Hadid's design language is recognizable in all her work
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Whether designing a skyscraper or a toilet, Zaha Hadid's design language is recognizable in all her work
The Kensington was co-designed with longtime Hadid collaborator Patrik Schumacher and unveiled under the Zaha Hadid Design umbrella
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The Kensington was co-designed with longtime Hadid collaborator Patrik Schumacher and unveiled under the Zaha Hadid Design umbrella
"Both a civic gesture and a promotional medium, the intertwined, looped ribbon design expresses the dynamism of pedestrian and vehicle traffic movements that intersect at this important London junction," says Melodie Leung, senior associate at Zaha Hadid Design
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"Both a civic gesture and a promotional medium, the intertwined, looped ribbon design expresses the dynamism of pedestrian and vehicle traffic movements that intersect at this important London junction," says Melodie Leung, senior associate at Zaha Hadid Design
The Kensington's eye-catching twists and curves are toward the rear
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The Kensington's eye-catching twists and curves are toward the rear
The Kensington's rear area is defined by a twisted double ribbon of matte steel
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The Kensington's rear area is defined by a twisted double ribbon of matte steel
The Kensington is set into a landscaped area with integrated lighting
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The Kensington is set into a landscaped area with integrated lighting
The Kensington's form is meant to represent the dynamism of pedestrian and vehicle traffic
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The Kensington's form is meant to represent the dynamism of pedestrian and vehicle traffic
Whether designing a skyscraper or a toilet, Zaha Hadid's design language is recognizable in all her work
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Whether designing a skyscraper or a toilet, Zaha Hadid's design language is recognizable in all her work
To the front, the Kensington billboard displays adverts to London drivers, while pedestrians at the rear get to enjoy Zaha Hadid's signature design language
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To the front, the Kensington billboard displays adverts to London drivers, while pedestrians at the rear get to enjoy Zaha Hadid's signature design language

Whether an architectural masterpiece or a toilet, Zaha Hadid's design language is recognizable in all her work. We're reminded of this again by a new billboard conceived by the late Hadid and longtime collaborator Patrik Schumacher that was recently installed on a busy road in London.

The billboard is unimaginatively named the Kensington on account of its location in Kensington, central London, and was commissioned by signage specialist JCDecaux. Hadid previously designed another billboard for the same firm in Hollywood, too.

The structure is fronted by a curved digital display measuring 26 x 6 m ( 85 x 20 ft) that faces the road and hawks expensive goods to drivers, including Audi's Q8, pictured above. The pedestrian-facing side is the more interesting aspect though, and comprises a twisted and curving double ribbon of matte steel set into a landscaped area with integrated lighting. Its overall form is meant to reflect the dynamism of pedestrian and vehicle traffic.

Whether designing a skyscraper or a toilet, Zaha Hadid's design language is recognizable in all her work
Whether designing a skyscraper or a toilet, Zaha Hadid's design language is recognizable in all her work

The Kensington was produced under the Zaha Hadid Design moniker, which is responsible for other Hadid-designed minor works, including the bathroom mentioned above and a dog shelter.

"Both a civic gesture and a promotional medium, the intertwined, looped ribbon design expresses the dynamism of pedestrian and vehicle traffic movements that intersect at this important London junction," says Melodie Leung, senior associate at Zaha Hadid Design. "The stainless steel ribbon twists as it encircles the screen, defining a varying silhouette when seen from different viewpoints."

Source: Zaha Hadid Architects

3 comments
Username
The title is nonsense. There is nothing in the article to suggest there is more than meets the eye. It is a large public sculpture with a billboard in it.
McDesign
Holy crap, that's a hideous intrusion on the sidewalk - it looks like a crane fell.
ErstO
Thats on west Cromwell, and although better looking then the old one, thats a lot of steel and concrete to house an advert thats doing nothing but hiding the trees behind it.
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