Automotive

ZF's Vision Zero Vehicle showcases active safety systems

ZF's Vision Zero Vehicle showc...
The ZF Vision Zero Vehicle 
The ZF Vision Zero Vehicle 
View 16 Images
Behind the wheel of a car with wrong-way warning 
1/16
Behind the wheel of a car with wrong-way warning 
ZF wants to warn people if they're heading the wrong way down highway on-ramps 
2/16
ZF wants to warn people if they're heading the wrong way down highway on-ramps 
The ZF Vision Zero Vehicle 
3/16
The ZF Vision Zero Vehicle 
The ZF Vision Zero Vehicle is based on a VW Touran
4/16
The ZF Vision Zero Vehicle is based on a VW Touran
ZF is aiming to combat distracted driving with a warning system 
5/16
ZF is aiming to combat distracted driving with a warning system 
ZF will be putting its Vision Zero Vehicle in display at IAA in Frankfurt
6/16
ZF will be putting its Vision Zero Vehicle in display at IAA in Frankfurt
ZF is aiming to cut down on distracted driving by monitoring drivers with an in-cabin camera 
7/16
ZF is aiming to cut down on distracted driving by monitoring drivers with an in-cabin camera 
The ZF Vision Zero Vehicle shows what component manufacturers can do in the push towards electrification 
8/16
The ZF Vision Zero Vehicle shows what component manufacturers can do in the push towards electrification 
The ZF Vision Zero Vehicle 
9/16
The ZF Vision Zero Vehicle 
The ZF Vision Zero Vehicle has a 150-kW electric motor on the rear axle
10/16
The ZF Vision Zero Vehicle has a 150-kW electric motor on the rear axle
Wrong-way warnings in the ZF Vision Zero Vehicle
11/16
Wrong-way warnings in the ZF Vision Zero Vehicle
The ZF concept uses a forward facing camera to warn against driving the wrong way on freeway onramps
12/16
The ZF concept uses a forward facing camera to warn against driving the wrong way on freeway onramps
ZF will stop the car when you try to drive the wrong way onto a highway onramp
13/16
ZF will stop the car when you try to drive the wrong way onto a highway onramp
Wrong-way warnings in the ZF Vision Zero Vehicle
14/16
Wrong-way warnings in the ZF Vision Zero Vehicle
The mSTARS modular suspension system includes an electric motor
15/16
The mSTARS modular suspension system includes an electric motor
The mSTARS suspension system
16/16
The mSTARS suspension system
View gallery - 16 images

Active safety features are advancing rapidly, and suppliers are always looking to outdo the competition. ZF Friedrichshafen is known for gearboxes, but it also creates drive units and active safety systems for manufacturers to slot into their cars. The Vision Zero Vehicle is designed to showcase all those technologies into the one neat package.

Headlining the active safety features in the Vision Zero Vehicle (VZV) are wrong-way inhibit and driver distraction assist. According to research quoted by ZF, around 10 percent of road fatalities are caused by distracted driving, which was also the cause of 350 deadly accidents in Germany and 3,477 fatalities in America last year. So making sure drivers keep their eyes on the road is of utmost importance.

The ZF system uses a smart laser-based interior camera to monitor the position of the driver's head behind the wheel, even in the dark. It knows when the driver looks away from the road, and warns them of danger with a message on the dashboard, an audio warning and a tighter seatbelt. The system will also take over the steering and, if the driver doesn't respond, cut power and park the car safely on the side of the road.

Behind the wheel of a car with wrong-way warning 
Behind the wheel of a car with wrong-way warning 

Along with distraction, drivers entering motorways in the wrong direction is a major cause of accidents in the US. The VZV uses its cloud-based mapping software, along with traffic signs and road markings interpreted through a front-mounted camera, to work out when drivers are headed in the wrong direction.

The first step in ZF's warning system is, once again, a visual message, an audible chime and the tightening of the seatbelt. Should the driver try to turn the wrong way down a motorway exit, the steering wheel will be much harder to turn than normal. If the driver still doesn't get the message, the car will pull to the side of the road. The driver can only drive away from the exit in reverse, or by turning around only if the car thinks there's room to safely do so.

The car being used to demonstrate all these technologies is a Volkswagen Touran fitted with ZF's modular semi-trailing arm rear suspension (mSTARS). The mSTARS setup includes a 150-kW (201-hp) electric motor, and is designed to demonstrate how existing cars can be electrified with new, third-party components.

The ZVZ will be on display at the Frankfurt Motor Show in September.

Source: ZF Automotive

View gallery - 16 images
1 comment
guzmanchinky
With 100 deaths a day in the US alone, tech that can prevent crashes cannot arrive soon enough...