3D Printing

Traditional Indian spice added to 3D-printed ensemble

Traditional Indian spice added...
Mac Creedon playing the 3D-printed sitar
Mac Creedon playing the 3D-printed sitar
View 10 Images
The 3D-printed sitar designed and printed by 3DLI in collaboration with the Mat Creedon School of Music
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The 3D-printed sitar designed and printed by 3DLI in collaboration with the Mat Creedon School of Music
Non-printed parts include the strings, the frets and a standard bridge
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Non-printed parts include the strings, the frets and a standard bridge
19 printed tuning pegs (or kunti) are placed at appropriate points along the head and neck
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19 printed tuning pegs (or kunti) are placed at appropriate points along the head and neck
The 3DLI team used a traditional sitar for CAD modeling
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The 3DLI team used a traditional sitar for CAD modeling
19 printed tuning pegs (or kunti) are placed at appropriate points along the head and neck
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19 printed tuning pegs (or kunti) are placed at appropriate points along the head and neck
Strings fed over non-printed frets to the tuning pins at the head
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Strings fed over non-printed frets to the tuning pins at the head
19 printed tuning pegs (or kunti) are placed at appropriate points along the head and neck
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19 printed tuning pegs (or kunti) are placed at appropriate points along the head and neck
A standard bridge was used to help create the distinctive sound of the sitar
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A standard bridge was used to help create the distinctive sound of the sitar
The body and neck of the 1.2 meter-long printed sitar are made up of several printed components welded together
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The body and neck of the 1.2 meter-long printed sitar are made up of several printed components welded together
Mac Creedon playing the 3D-printed sitar
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Mac Creedon playing the 3D-printed sitar
View gallery - 10 images

Wood and metal have pretty much been the materials of choice for craftsmen making acoustic instruments for many years, but the rise of 3D printing in recent times has brought us guitars, violins, flutes, saxophones and even drum kits fashioned from plastic or nylon. Now Australia's 3DLI has created what is believed to be the world's first fully working 3D-printed sitar.

Designed and printed in collaboration with the Mat Creedon School of Music in Victoria, Australia, the 3DLI team used a traditional sitar for CAD modeling, maintaining the wall thicknesses and hollow cavities of the original so that it would retain the distinctive sound and tonal qualities of the original. Though the plastic replica is said to be louder.

The 3D-printed sitar designed and printed by 3DLI in collaboration with the Mat Creedon School of Music
The 3D-printed sitar designed and printed by 3DLI in collaboration with the Mat Creedon School of Music

The body and neck of the 1.2 meter-long (4 ft) printed sitar are made up of several printed components welded together, with 19 printed tuning pegs (or kunti) placed at appropriate points along the head and neck. The 3DLI sitar is reported to have taken more than 70 to hours to print and used some 3.5 kg (7.7 lb) of ABS plastic. Each layer was printed at 0.2 mm.

Non-printed parts include the strings, the frets and a standard bridge (to help create the distinctive sound of the sitar).

You can see and hear the 3d-printed sitar in action at about the 1:40 point in the video below.

Source: 3DLI

First ever 3D printed Sitar. Part 1 of 3

View gallery - 10 images
2 comments
npublici
I would have liked to actually have heard the plastic Sitar,insted of the programmed synthesizer 2/3 of the way, then to soft sitar along with loud drums. Changes in modeling of the sitar to simulate wood grain effects will possibly enhance the sound.
nimbuzz
I agree with npu = it's a very interesting concept but LET'S HEAR IT! A short audio at the end with the drums too loud is not good enough--just move the mic way away from the tablas if you can't turn a mixer level down so we can hear the sitar. How the sitar sounds is the WHOLE point! Thanks, A