Photographer Alla Ponomareva and her husband Garrett wanted a new guest house for their home near Missoula, Montana. Rather than commission a firm to build it for them, the pair rolled-up their sleeves and constructed a solar-powered A-frame cabin for roughly US$700.

Ponomareva purchased the plans for the A-frame from well-known tiny house enthusiast Derek Diedricksen, then got to work building it with her husband. First they constructed the floor in a barn and used a tractor to move it to the exact spot they wanted to install it on their land, raising it a little off the ground on tree stumps.

The A-frame is made from recycled materials and stuff they already had lying around, including window frames, boards, nails, and roofing. The pair built their own door, which has an unusual handle made from an antler, while steps up to the deck were chainsawed from logs.

An aged log was turned into a countertop and a plastic sheeting wall section serves to increase natural light and encourage stargazing. The transparent wall can also be lifted upwards to open the tiny dwelling to the outside. Tongue and groove was used for the siding. In all, it took around three weeks to build.

Inside, the cabin measures only 80 sq ft (7.4 sq m) and includes two single beds, which can be pushed together, in addition to some shelving. A solar panel should offer enough electricity for charging smartphones and similar devices, while a camping stove and some pots and pans and utensils are on-hand for snacks and hot drinks.

There's no running water or toilet inside the cabin, though an outdoor toilet and a portable solar shower are just a short walk away. A couple of hammocks are installed outside along with some camping chairs on the deck area.

Check out our gallery for some shots of the A-frame cabin and Ponomareva's website for more details on its construction.

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