Architecture

Europe's largest arts park hosts tubular getaway's precarious balancing act

Europe's largest arts park hos...
Russian Quintessential measures a total length of 12 m (39 ft) and has a width of 3.5 m (11 ft)
Russian Quintessential measures a total length of 12 m (39 ft) and has a width of 3.5 m (11 ft)
View 9 Images
Russian Quintessential measures a total length of 12 m (39 ft) and has a width of 3.5 m (11 ft)
1/9
Russian Quintessential measures a total length of 12 m (39 ft) and has a width of 3.5 m (11 ft)
Russian Quintessential juts out of a small hillside and is secured onto its foundation by six bolts
2/9
Russian Quintessential juts out of a small hillside and is secured onto its foundation by six bolts
Russian Quintessential's interior walls are finished in wood, and it has a modern decor
3/9
Russian Quintessential's interior walls are finished in wood, and it has a modern decor
Russian Quintessential
4/9
Russian Quintessential features a small balcony area
Russian Quintessential is accessed through glass doors located on the small hill
5/9
Russian Quintessential is accessed through glass doors located on the small hill
Russian Quintessential's exterior is finished in stainless steel
6/9
Russian Quintessential's exterior is finished in stainless steel
Russian Quintessential was created for Russia's Archstoyanie arts festival
7/9
Russian Quintessential was created for Russia's Archstoyanie arts festival
Russian Quintessential looks best suited for short stays, and includes a double bed and a desk area
8/9
Russian Quintessential looks best suited for short stays, and includes a double bed and a desk area
Structurally, Russian Quintessential frame is similar to a ship's hull and consists of steel ribs to lend it strength
9/9
Structurally, Russian Quintessential frame is similar to a ship's hull and consists of steel ribs to lend it strength
View gallery - 9 images

Cantilevering dramatically out of a small hill in Russia, the recently completed Russian Quintessential is conceived as both a stunning piece of modern art and a weekend getaway. Its reflective facade and tubular shape certainly make an impression, and contains a compact but comfortable-looking dwelling inside.

Russian Quintessential was designed by Sergey Kuznetsov, who also holds the prestigious title of Chief Architect of Moscow, and the project involved Russian construction firm KROST too. Its overall form brings to mind the Tubular Bells album cover by Mike Oldfield and it measures 12 m (39 ft) long and 3.5 m (11 ft) wide, which is roughly the size of one of the larger North American tiny houses, though unlike those homes it definitely seems better suited to short stays rather than full-time living.

Russian Quintessential looks best suited for short stays, and includes a double bed and a desk area
Russian Quintessential looks best suited for short stays, and includes a double bed and a desk area

Structurally, the project is likened to the hull of a ship by KROST. It consists of a steel frame made up of multiple ribs that lend it adequate strength to jut out of the hillside without buckling under its weight of approximately 12 tons. According to Kuznetsov, it's secured to its foundation by just six bolts and insulation helps keep the interior comfortable even in the famously harsh Russian winter.

"The basis of the metal frame is made up of transverse frames – load-bearing ribs installed at a pitch of 500 mm [19.6 in] relative to each other and connected by means of stringers (horizontal guides)," explains KROST. "Due to the polyurethane foam insulation inside the pavilion, a comfortable temperature regime will be maintained throughout the year. This is a vivid example of when bold and original ideas are implemented by the capabilities of a modern industrial and technological complex."

The shell is wrapped in stainless steel sheeting, lending it that reflective appearance. The interior layout is arranged on one level and includes a neat little balcony area, as well as a bathroom with a shower and toilet. Elsewhere, there's a simple kitchenette with a microwave, cabinetry and a sink. There's also a storage-integrated double bed and a desk nearby. Access to the home is gained by glass doors on the opposite side from the balcony.

Russian Quintessential's interior walls are finished in wood, and it has a modern decor
Russian Quintessential's interior walls are finished in wood, and it has a modern decor

Russian Quintessential was created for the Archstoyanie festival in Nikola-Lenivets, which is described as Europe's largest arts park and is located in the Kaluga region of Russia.

Source: Sergey Kuznetsov

View gallery - 9 images
3 comments
3 comments
Bob Flint
Big ugly can on the hill side...
Worzel
Seems much the same as sewage pipe tiny homes, except its chrome plated.
Worzel
Where's the bathroom?