Tiny Houses

Pair of engineers design pet-friendly off-grid tiny house

Pair of engineers design pet-f...
The project was a real labor of love and took a total of 18 months to design
The project was a real labor of love and took a total of 18 months to design
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The bathroom includes a composting toilet
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The bathroom includes a composting toilet
Defined by a large rooftop deck that adds additional living space, the Basecamp is jam-packed with storage space
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Defined by a large rooftop deck that adds additional living space, the Basecamp is jam-packed with storage space
The kitchen area
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The kitchen area
The lounge area
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The lounge area
The tiny home includes plenty of dog related items, including kennel space and toys 
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The tiny home includes plenty of dog related items, including kennel space and toys 
A storage-integrated staircase leads upstairs
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A storage-integrated staircase leads upstairs
The rooftop-based solar array powers the home
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The rooftop-based solar array powers the home
The interior is accessed via the single door
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The interior is accessed via the single door
The off-grid technology is housed in an external box 
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The off-grid technology is housed in an external box 
View from the storage loft
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View from the storage loft
Basecamp comprises a total floorspace of 204 sq ft (19 sq m
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Basecamp comprises a total floorspace of 204 sq ft (19 sq m
The storage space atop the lounge 
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The storage space atop the lounge 
The shower has been titled and outfitted with a custom cedar floor
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The shower has been titled and outfitted with a custom cedar floor
The bedroom 
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The bedroom 
The tiny home features a focus on storage space
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The tiny home features a focus on storage space
View from the storage loft
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View from the storage loft
The tiny house features a large rooftop deck
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The tiny house features a large rooftop deck
Inside the kitchen
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Inside the kitchen
View of the tiny house from the storage loft
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View of the tiny house from the storage loft
The design has a definite focus on storage space
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The design has a definite focus on storage space
Inside the tiny house
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Inside the tiny house
Another view of the bedroom
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Another view of the bedroom
Bedroom with privacy gate closed
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Bedroom with privacy gate closed
Lots of different types of wood were used during construction, including tongue-and-groove cedar cladding on the exterior and redwood panels on the inside
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Lots of different types of wood were used during construction, including tongue-and-groove cedar cladding on the exterior and redwood panels on the inside
The project was a real labor of love and took a total of 18 months to design
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The project was a real labor of love and took a total of 18 months to design
Plans for the Basecamp are available for those wanting to replicate the build
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Plans for the Basecamp are available for those wanting to replicate the build

Despite having no prior experience, engineers Tina and Luke Orlando decided to jump right in and design their own tiny house from scratch. Their unconventional but very thorough approach resulted in a tiny house on wheels that's jam-packed with storage space, pet-friendly features, and sustainable technology to allow it to operate off-grid. Now it's complete, the pair are selling plans of the home for those interested in building their own.

The Basecamp tiny house is located on a rural spot near Beaverton, Oregon, sits on a three-axle trailer, and has a total floorspace of 204 sq ft (19 sq m). It's clad in attractive tongue-and-groove cedar and topped by a large rooftop deck.

The Orlandos began by identifying three primary concerns for their tiny home: storage space, off-grid functionality, and pet-friendly design (the pair foster dogs in addition to their own three).

The design process took 18 months, during which they drew on their experience in civil and mechanical engineering to mock-up plans and 3D models, tackling issues like size constraints, zoning restrictions, and plumbing along the way. They eventually hired tiny house firm Daystar Tiny Homes to actually build it.

The kitchen area
The kitchen area

Entering the home, visitors are presented with a living area on the right. This includes an L-shaped couch that pulls out into a guest bed, a wall-mounted TV, and a storage loft above. Venturing further into the home reveals a kitchen and bathroom with composting toilet and shower.

The finish looks excellent throughout and includes live-edge redwood slab countertops, cabinets and custom furniture.

In addition to lots of storage nooks and foldaway furniture, the tiny house also includes around a dozen dog-specific items, such as kennel space, hideaway dens, built-in collapsible food and water bowls, a rainwater-harvesting dog waterer, and moving privacy gates.

The upstairs sleeping loft is reached via a storage-integrated staircase, and also has a small door which opens to an outdoor staircase that leads directly to the rooftop deck.

Another view of the bedroom
Another view of the bedroom

The Basecamp tiny house operates totally off the grid with a rainwater collection system, a roof-based solar array, and battery backup. The heating and cooking is fueled by propane gas, and a grey-water system and on-demand water heater designed for off-grid homes are also installed.

The Orlandos have set up a website for the Basecamp tiny house and are selling plans for it. There are a lot of options available including a pet-friendly package with all the dog and cat-related design features and an off-grid package. More information via the source link below.

Source: Backcountry Tiny Homes

5 comments
AGL_Bob
How is it "totally of the grid" if you have to buy propane?
BigGoofyGuy
I think that is really nice.
Helios
I'd like to see the tow vehicles required to move these. They might be "tiny homes" but they are also huge trailers. Therefore, impractical and costly to move once, let alone on a frequent basis. Tiny homes are NOT an intelligent solution to housing. Stack a few dozen of these together and on top of each other, you get an efficiency apartment building. That is an intelligent solution.
MattII
@AGL_Bob, 'the grid' refers to the electric grid in this place, so the claim is true, since they don't draw power from outside.
yawood
@MattII & @AGL_Bob. Not just power but also water and gas. It is off the grid because it is not connected to any of those utilities. Buying propane tanks is not the same as connecting to a permanent gas line.