Bicycles

Convertible ebike is always ready for the rain

Convertible ebike is always re...
Inventor Tom Eisner, raising the roof on his AllWeatherBike prototype
Inventor Tom Eisner, raising the roof on his AllWeatherBike prototype
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If equipped with two batteries, the AllWeatherBike has a claimed range of over 100 km (62 miles)
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If equipped with two batteries, the AllWeatherBike has a claimed range of over 100 km (62 miles)
Because it's no wider than a regular bicycle, the AllWeatherBike can be used in existing bike lanes
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Because it's no wider than a regular bicycle, the AllWeatherBike can be used in existing bike lanes
The cyclist's legs are protected (from rain coming from the front, at least) by a solid guard sheet that's attached to the AllWeatherBike's down tube
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The cyclist's legs are protected (from rain coming from the front, at least) by a solid guard sheet that's attached to the AllWeatherBike's down tube
The AllWeatherBike's handlebar-mounted control panel
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The AllWeatherBike's handlebar-mounted control panel
Inventor Tom Eisner, raising the roof on his AllWeatherBike prototype
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Inventor Tom Eisner, raising the roof on his AllWeatherBike prototype
A rendering of a planned production version of the AllWeatherBike
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A rendering of a planned production version of the AllWeatherBike
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We've recently seen a number of devices that can be added to bikes, that help keep the rider dry in the rain. A new ebike known as the AllWeatherBike, however, doesn't need any add-ons – its integrated "roof" can reportedly be pulled up in just three seconds.

Designed by German cyclist/entrepreneur Tom Eisner, the vehicle currently exists in the form of fully functional prototype. It's a bit reminiscent of the Sinclair X-1 semi-enclosed ebike, which never reached production.

The AllWeatherBike's aluminum frame incorporates two curved beams that arch up over the rider on either side, leaving them open to the elements when the weather is agreeable. Should it start raining, though, the cyclist pulls a sheet of clear plastic film up out of an enclosed roll located in front of the handlebars.

The outside edges of that sheet slide within slots that run the length of each of the two beams, guiding the sheet and holding it taut. Once it's been pulled all the way up over the rider, its top end is latched onto a rear crossbar that runs between the two beams. And once the rain ceases, the film is simply unlatched and allowed to retract back onto its roll in front. It basically works like an upside-down version of a roller blind on a window, except it's transparent.

If equipped with two batteries, the AllWeatherBike has a claimed range of over 100 km (62 miles)
If equipped with two batteries, the AllWeatherBike has a claimed range of over 100 km (62 miles)

According to Eisner, the plastic is quite tough, and stands up well to strong winds. Additionally, the cyclist's legs are protected (from rain coming from the front, at least) by a solid guard sheet that's attached to the bike's down tube.

The current prototype features a Bosch bottom bracket motor, and the capacity to hold two 750-Wh Bosch frame-integrated lithium batteries – in this configuration, it has a claimed motor-assisted range of over 100 km (62 miles).

Some of its other features include disc brakes, a belt drive drivetrain, front and rear cargo racks, fenders, a kickstand, and an adjustable-height saddle. There's no word on weight. Because it's no wider than a regular bicycle, though, it can be used in existing bike lanes.

A rendering of a planned production version of the AllWeatherBike
A rendering of a planned production version of the AllWeatherBike

The AllWeatherBike is currently on display at the Eurobike trade show, where Eisner is hoping to find a company that's interested in manufacturing it. He can be contacted via the Source link below.

Source: AllWeatherBike

View gallery - 6 images
4 comments
4 comments
geemy
a bike with a roll cage..
the weight and CoG are going to be awfull. speed/range probably too. that's a lot of compromises when you're not riding in the rain, but would be a game changer for a commuter replacement if its done properly, especially in wet climates (UK?). maybe more enjoyable than enclosed bikes, but probably much worse aero
geemy
regular ebkes are only as good as car replacements as your determination to ride everyday, no matter the weather. but for enclosed bikes/ bikes with large windshield, electric assist becomes almost a necessity.
paul314
As long as you're going fast enough that rain from the front is your main concern -- I wonder how the visibility is.
1stClassOPP
Not too useful, I think. For those who have experienced riding a bicycle in rain, they know that rain seldom comes straight down. So with any side wind, it’ll be totally useless. Imagine a car passing, or (horrors) a large truck.