Bicycles

Canyon Grail:ON ebike rocks super-versatile double decker handlebars

Canyon Grail:ON ebike rocks su...
The Grail:ON's double-decker handlebars offer a bunch of different riding position options
The Grail:ON's double-decker handlebars offer a bunch of different riding position options
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Canyon's Grail:ON is a lightweight, versatile gravel ebike
1/5
Canyon's Grail:ON is a lightweight, versatile gravel ebike
500-Wh battery pack can be removed for charging
2/5
500-Wh battery pack can be removed for charging
High-volume tires soak up bumps without being too wide for quick road riding
3/5
High-volume tires soak up bumps without being too wide for quick road riding
An 80-mile range and an 85-Nm Bosch mid-drive motor
4/5
An 80-mile range and an 85-Nm Bosch mid-drive motor
The Grail:ON's double-decker handlebars offer a bunch of different riding position options
5/5
The Grail:ON's double-decker handlebars offer a bunch of different riding position options
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High-end German bicycle manufacturer Canyon has released this sleek electric gravel bike, complete with an interesting double-decker handlebar setup designed to give riders a wide range of riding positions.

Gravel bikes are targeted at the space between road bikes and mountain bikes. They typically offer a roadbike-style drop handlebar, letting you get down low and push hard on the street, while running bigger, thicker tires and the lazier geometry you need for mild to medium off-road action. It's a growing segment, these things will happily take you on a cross-country adventure on the weekend then in to work on Monday without missing a beat.

Such a versatile riding profile is perfect to plonk a battery onto as well; how much more often would most people get out on a hilly gravel day ride if their bike was ready to chip in and help pedal in the tough bits?

High-volume tires soak up bumps without being too wide for quick road riding
High-volume tires soak up bumps without being too wide for quick road riding

Canyon has attempted to make an already versatile concept even more flexible with its Grail:ON e-gravel bike. Bringing the grunt is Bosch's excellent Performance Line CX motor (gen 4), which, as we wrote a week or two back, has been upgraded to offer a healthy 85 Nm of torque on its highest "turbo" setting.

The battery is a nicely integrated removable unit in the downtube, storing 500 Wh of energy that's good for up to 80 miles if you ride conservatively. A bigger battery might be nicer, but on the other hand these things can get quite heavy, and Canyon's done a pretty impressive job of keeping the weight down to between 15.9 kg (35 lb) and 17.1 kg (37 lb) depending on which model you go for, using a full carbon frame.

The tires are thick-ish 50-mm Schwalbe G-One Bites, high-volume units to soak up some bumps off-road but not cost you too much in the way of rolling resistance on road. The seat post itself is comfort-focused too, using a leaf spring design to take even more bump out of your rump.

Canyon's Grail:ON is a lightweight, versatile gravel ebike
Canyon's Grail:ON is a lightweight, versatile gravel ebike

But the key to this bike's remarkable versatility is its double-decker handlebar, which gives you the chance to choose between four different hand positions, from the low drop bars, to a low flat bar, to a higher, MTB-style flat bar or a set of high hoods for when you're working hard. It looks a bit weird, but options can be heaven-sent on a long day in the saddle.

The Grail:ON is available in several versions, only two of which are coming to America. The US$5,799 CF 8 uses Shimano GRX shifting, and the US$6,999 CF 8 ETAP uses a higher grade SRAM Force ETAP electronic shift system and fancier carbon rims. It's available now.

Source: Canyon Bicycles

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2 comments
Chuck Cronin
Usually keep up with all that is Canyon, but did not see this yet. Thanks
Kevn
"But the key to this bike's remarkable versatility is its double-decker handlebar, which gives you the chance to choose between four different hand positions..."

How about pictures of those four different positions?