Bicycles

Graphene composite Hiplok D1000 is designed to stop angle grinders

Graphene composite Hiplok D100...
The Hiplok D1000 is presently on Kickstarter
The Hiplok D1000 is presently on Kickstarter
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The Hiplok D1000 is said to weigh in 1.8 kg (4 lb)
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The Hiplok D1000 is said to weigh in 1.8 kg (4 lb)
The Hiplok D1000 is presently on Kickstarter
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The Hiplok D1000 is presently on Kickstarter
The Hiplok D1000's planned retail price is £280 (about $377)
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The Hiplok D1000's planned retail price is £280 (about $377)
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Even with the toughest-looking bike locks, many people still say, "An angle grinder would go right through that." Well, Hiplok's new D1000 is claimed to be different – it's touted as being "the first portable anti-angle-grinder bike lock."

According to UK-based Hiplok, the secret to the D1000 is the fact that it incorporates a graphene composite material known as Ferosafe, along with a square-profile hardened steel core.

Produced by British firm Tenmat, Ferosafe is designed specifically to be resistant to cutting, drilling and angle grinding, while remaining weldable and relatively lightweight. Its intended applications include safes, ATMs and lock boxes.

The Hiplok D1000 is said to weigh in 1.8 kg (4 lb)
The Hiplok D1000 is said to weigh in 1.8 kg (4 lb)

The D1000 also features a rubberized coating to protect the bike's paint from getting chipped or scratched; a shackle which would have to be cut on both sides in order to be removed, thanks to its anti-rotation double-locking tabs; plus a rubberized weatherproof seal around the key hole. It reportedly tips the scales at 1.8 kg (4 lb), and has internal locking dimensions of 155 mm high by 92 mm wide (6.1 by 3.6 in).

Independent testing has resulted in the D1000 being given a Sold Secure Diamond rating for use on bicycles and motorcycles.

Should you be interested, it's currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign. Assuming it reaches production, a pledge of £168 (about US$226) will get you one, along with three keys. The planned retail price is £280 ($377).

You can see the lock in use, in the video below.

Hiplok D1000: Anti Angle Grinder Bike Lock

Sources: Kickstarter, Hiplok

View gallery - 3 images
14 comments
14 comments
Spud Murphy
Of course, it would be nice if there weren't so many scumbag thieves out there. Personally, I think a few broken fingers each time they are caught would be a much better deterrent than the slap on the wrist they get from the wimpy courts.
Trylon
A $377 lock? Good luck with that. I've wished that someone would make a lock out of a metal matrix composite, with silicon carbide particles in a cast aluminum or magnesium matrix. The SiC should make grinding very difficult. Pitting hard abrasives against hard particles would need a lot of strength and battery power.
Robt
@Trylon Yes it’s very expensive, but there are a lot of very costly electric bikes on the streets now. Maybe they’re the primary market for this?
Primecordial
One lock for the frame and the wheels are gone
David V
Heavy too. If it's un-cuttable then why so thick and heavy ?
Agree with you all though. @Robt - best deterrent for e-bikes is taking the battery out - but most people don't and they're usually too long to fit in a backpack. Another UX fail.
michael_dowling
The illustration in the story shows the lock locking the frame to the bike stand. If the lock is uncuttable,the stand isn't. Easy job for an angle grinder. As David V said,best to take the battery with you if you own an e-bike. Maybe this will encourage e-bike makers to design their batteries for easy removal and storage.
Bodger
Angle grinder? Maybe. Oxy-MAPP cutting torch? Probably not. I can buy a cutting torch set that is small enough to fit under a bulky coat on Amazon for under $100 that would probably do the job. Of course you'd want to have a protective mat to protect the bike's paint but still the cost is low. And, compared to an angle grinder it it pretty quiet.
Aross
No mention of how it fares if a diamond cutting wheel is used.
Bob Flint
Heads up, cut the attachment point, tree, bar etc. them deal with the lock latter...
Robert Craigs
The steel pipe it was locked to could be cut more easily.
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