Bicycles

Luna Cycles sets trails on fire with 2,500-watt X2 Enduro ebike

Luna Cycles sets trails on fir...
The X2 Enduro can be had with Luna's latest Ludicrous controller to unlock up to 2,500 watts of motor power
The X2 Enduro can be had with Luna's latest Ludicrous controller to unlock up to 2,500 watts of motor power
View 4 Images
The X2 Enduro can be had with Luna's latest Ludicrous controller to unlock up to 2,500 watts of motor power
1/4
The X2 Enduro can be had with Luna's latest Ludicrous controller to unlock up to 2,500 watts of motor power
The X2 Enduro tips the scales at 58 lb thanks to a carbon fiber frame
2/4
The X2 Enduro tips the scales at 58 lb thanks to a carbon fiber frame
The removable and lockable 820-Wh battery integrated into the downtube is reported good for up to 40 miles of per-charge pedal assist
3/4
The removable and lockable 820-Wh battery integrated into the downtube is reported good for up to 40 miles of per-charge pedal assist
The X2 Enduro features Rockshox full suspension, SRAM disc brakes and gearset, and a dropper seatpost
4/4
The X2 Enduro features Rockshox full suspension, SRAM disc brakes and gearset, and a dropper seatpost
View gallery - 4 images

Back in 2019, Luna Cycles unchained the ground-breaking X1 Enduro ebike, a 50-lb performance monster with up to 2,000 watts of power on tap, full suspension and up to 40 miles of per-charge range. Now the company has unveiled an improved model.

As for the X1, the company has selected a 750-W Luna-tuned Bafang M600 mid-drive motor with a torque sensor for the X2 Enduro, but the ebike can be optioned with the latest version of Luna's Ludicrous controller – which has been custom made for the M600 – that puts out 60 amps for up to 2,500 watts of motor-assisted off-road fun.

The V2 Ludi "is 84 V rated for 72 V (20s) batteries, which makes it extremely reliable at 48 V operation with the stock battery" and "balances the user-adjustable buttery smooth pedal assist with the raw torque of 100 phase amps readily available at the throttle."

The new Class 3 ebike comes with a larger removable battery in the downtube than before, a 48-V/17.5-Ah module made up of LG cells, but offers the same 30-40 miles (50-65 km) of per-charge range when in pedal-assist mode. And a carbon fiber frame is available in three sizes, and helps the X2 achieve an overall weight of 58 lb (26.3 kg).

The removable and lockable 820-Wh battery integrated into the downtube is reported good for up to 40 miles of per-charge pedal assist
The removable and lockable 820-Wh battery integrated into the downtube is reported good for up to 40 miles of per-charge pedal assist

Elsewhere, the once optional silent gear fashioned from composite peek plastic is now standard with the X2, and is reported to make the ride "super quiet" compared to Bafang's steel gear. There's Rockshox Debonair Yari 160-mm forks and Rockshox Deluxe Select+ 210-mm rear suspension for help smoothing out the bumps, and a KS dropper seatpost that gets the saddle out of the way during more technical sections of the trail. The ebike rides on 27.5-inch Maxxis tires, sports a SRAM Eagle 12-speed derailleur for ride flexibility, and stopping power comes from SRAM hydraulic brakes.

The high-performance X2 Enduro ebike is priced at US$4,200, but if you want Ludicrous Mode you're going to have to stump up an additional $400. Luna has also released a Z1 Enduro model this weekend for the same base price, which is something of a twin to the X2 but comes with the larger Bafang Ultra motor – a 1,600-watt version of the Bafang M620 – and no Ludicrous option.

Product pages: Luna X2 Enduro, Z1 Enduro (H/T Elektrek)

View gallery - 4 images
2 comments
2 comments
guzmanchinky
So this bike is cool, but it will **** people on the bike trails off if it has that much power. People are just getting used to seeing "Class 1 ebikes OK" and those will go away if teens on bikes like this tear up the trails...
Trylon
I've never understood this "need for speed" on singletrack. I remember seeing a POV video of a guy bombing down a singletrack in a wide open field. He had to be so focused on keeping his line that he didn't even notice a couple of people walking down the singletrack right in front of him and crashed right into them. Yes, they shouldn't have been there, but if you have to be so focused on speed that you don't notice anything at all around you, then what's the point of being out in the woods? I prefer to enjoy the peace and quiet, and all the myriad sights, sounds and smells when I'm in the great outdoors.