Bicycles

OxiLum takes a unique hands-on approach to bicycle brake lights

OxiLum takes a unique hands-on approach to bicycle brake lights
The OxiLum (and its accompanying OxiBrake device, not pictured) is presently on Kickstarter
The OxiLum (and its accompanying OxiBrake device, not pictured) is presently on Kickstarter
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The OxiBrake is flexible, so it works with levers of various shapes and sizes
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The OxiBrake is flexible, so it works with levers of various shapes and sizes
The OxiLum can be mounted on the bike, instead of or as well as the helmet
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The OxiLum can be mounted on the bike, instead of or as well as the helmet
The OxiLum can illuminate white, to serve as a headlight
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The OxiLum can illuminate white, to serve as a headlight
The OxiLum (and its accompanying OxiBrake device, not pictured) is presently on Kickstarter
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The OxiLum (and its accompanying OxiBrake device, not pictured) is presently on Kickstarter
View gallery - 4 images

Although there are now a number of helmet-mounted brake lights on the market, they're almost all activated by an integrated accelerometer. The OxiLum takes what is claimed to be a better approach, as it's triggered by a brake-lever-mounted device.

Currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign, the OxiLum is the creation of French company Overade, which previously brought us a folding helmet and a set of helmet-mounted turn indicators.

The OxiLum pops on and off of an included magnetic mount, which gets attached to the back of the user's existing helmet – that mount can also be attached to the bike itself, in locations such as the back of the seatpost or rear rack.

If the user wishes, the OxiLum can be purchased and used on its own, as a standalone tail light. By pressing a button in the middle of the device, it can be set to one of eight different output modes – these include various steady, pulsing and flashing patterns, at intensities ranging from 9 to 100 lumens. It can also be set to illuminate white instead of red, allowing it to serve as a be-seen type headlight.

The OxiBrake is flexible, so it works with levers of various shapes and sizes
The OxiBrake is flexible, so it works with levers of various shapes and sizes

The brake light feature comes into play if buyers opt for the extra OxiBrake device.

It slips onto one of the bike's existing brake levers, and contains a pressure sensor that detects when the lever is being squeezed by the rider's hand. The OxiBrake responds to such squeezes by sending a wireless signal to the OxiLum, causing it to illuminate accordingly. A red LED on the OxiBrake itself also illuminates, to let the rider know that the brake light is indeed functioning.

According to Overade, this setup is better than accelerometer-activated helmet brake lights for three reasons: such lights may not be activated by gentle braking, they can get "confused" by head movements, plus (if they incorporate a timer) they may shut off before the rider has completely braked to a stop.

The OxiLum can be mounted on the bike, instead of or as well as the helmet
The OxiLum can be mounted on the bike, instead of or as well as the helmet

The OxiBrake powers up automatically when squeezed, and can be paired with up to four OxiLums. One 2.5-hour charge of its battery should reportedly be good for one month of use. A half-hour charge of the OxiLum's battery is claimed to offer anywhere from six to 21 hours of runtime, depending on the output mode. Both devices are water-resistant.

Assuming the system reaches production, a pledge of €30 (about US$32) will get you a single OxiLum, with €55 ($59) required for an OxiLum and an OxiBrake. The planned retail prices are $55 and $95, respectively.

You can see the setup in use, in the following video.

OxiLum

Source: Kickstarter

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