Health & Wellbeing

Glyder lets you exercise at your desk without whacking your knees

Glyder lets you exercise at yo...
The Compactix Glyder in use
The Compactix Glyder in use
View 8 Images
The Compactix Glyder in use
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The Compactix Glyder in use
The Glyder incorporates electromagnetic resistance
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The Glyder incorporates electromagnetic resistance
It runs off of AC power
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It runs off of AC power
The width of the pedals can be adjusted
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The width of the pedals can be adjusted
The planned retail price is $179
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The planned retail price is $179
The amount of resistance can be set using either a knob on the machine itself, or via Bluetooth using an accompanying free smartphone app
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The amount of resistance can be set using either a knob on the machine itself, or via Bluetooth using an accompanying free smartphone app
The app also lets you monitor calories burned and distance glided, plus it allows you to monitor your progress over time and to compete against other Glyder users
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The app also lets you monitor calories burned and distance glided, plus it allows you to monitor your progress over time and to compete against other Glyder users
Because it uses electromagnetic resistance as opposed to friction, it's claimed to be fairly quiet when in use
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Because it uses electromagnetic resistance as opposed to friction, it's claimed to be fairly quiet when in use
View gallery - 8 images

By now, pretty much everyone has heard about the health risks involved with remaining seated and sedentary for long periods of time. Standing desks are designed to address the problem, as are miniature cycling and elliptical trainers that can be used under a conventional desk while you remain seated. One of the problems with those machines, however, is that your knees may bang against the underside of your desk as you're using them – plus, they can be noisy. That's where the Compactix Glyder comes in.

As its name implies, the Glyder lets you get that desk-bound exercise by gliding your feet horizontally back and forth.

And yes, you could do the same basic thing just using your slippery socks against the floor, although the Glyder incorporates electromagnetic resistance to give you more of a workout. The amount of resistance can be set using either a knob on the machine itself, or via Bluetooth using an accompanying free smartphone app.

That app also lets you monitor calories burned and distance glided, plus it allows you to monitor your progress over time and to compete against other Glyder users.

It runs off of AC power
It runs off of AC power

Because it uses electromagnetic resistance as opposed to friction, the Glyder is claimed to be fairly quiet when in use – an important consideration, if it's being used in a shared work space. It does require access to an electrical outlet, however.

The Compactix team is presently raising production funds for their device, on Kickstarter. A pledge of US$99 will get you one, when and if they're ready to go. The planned retail price is $179.

You can see the Glyder in use, in the pitch video below.

Sources: Kickstarter, Compactix

View gallery - 8 images
7 comments
EddieG
Wax your car. Paint your house. Dig a garden. If you try hard enough, you'll think of something constructive to do. This contraption is the most ridiculous thing I've seen in some time.
Gadgeteer
Eddie,
Stop being in such a hurry to post negative comments. This gadget is designed for exercise while you work in an office. I don't know about you, but my boss would frown on me trying to do any of your "constructive" activities on company time. Can you do those after work? Sure. But again, read the studies. They've found that the health risks of sitting for extended periods is not offset by exercise before or afterward.
Seems kind of wasteful, though. Why make it have to plug into an outlet when it could generate its own power? Also, the stance seems rather wide.
Slowburn
Who knew that water coolers saved lives.
Dave Lawrence
As office based exercise tech this is woeful - get your carcass out of there and go speak to people, network, make someone a coffee who is busy, take the long way round to take a dump - anything . . . . . this is LAME
I'd far prefer someone invent drag socks that don't allow you to fall on your arse when you walk on slippery surfaces. Be useful for old people and the disabled. But no, we get this pile of ********
VirtualGathis
I agree with Gadgeteer. This thing isn't designed for those gifted enough not to have an office job. For 8 hours a day us desk jockeys are required to sit or stand at our desks with very little movement. Just from the pain I can tell you that this is not a the way the human body is meant to be used. Seeign it from the studies only makes it more concrete that some form of regular moving/excersize is required for health.
As Gadgeteer says management dakes a dim view of workers who get up from the desk every 15 minutes to take a 5 minute walking break, which is what is required to prevent health issues through ordinary excersizes.
MadMaxx
Instead of being plugged in it should be designed so you plug your laptop into it and do something useful with the energy expended.
Sarah Weinberg
I have to admit that this office based exercise equipment has a potential to be popular among the people who spend a lot of time sitting and working either at home or in an office, but what I am truly interested in is how much it really helps in shaping my muscles, espetialy gluteus if you take in consider that I sit and only move my lower legs. :)