Tiny Houses

This tiny house raises the roof – literally

This tiny house raises the roo...
The big idea behind the Devasa is that it's easy to tow in the lowered position, but when parked, it can expand upward and offer additional headroom
The big idea behind the Devasa is that it's easy to tow in the lowered position, but when parked, it can expand upward and offer additional headroom
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The Devasa comprises around 300 sq ft (28 sq m) of floorspace
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The Devasa comprises around 300 sq ft (28 sq m) of floorspace
The Devasa's interior includes a snug living room area, a kitchen and a bathroom
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The Devasa's interior includes a snug living room area, a kitchen and a bathroom
The Devasa's kitchen has no appliances but does have the cabinets installed
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The Devasa's kitchen has no appliances but does have the cabinets installed
The Devasa gets power and water from standard RV-style hookups 
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The Devasa gets power and water from standard RV-style hookups 
One of the Devasa's bedrooms, with the roof shown in the raised position 
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One of the Devasa's bedrooms, with the roof shown in the raised position 
The Devasa's staircase has integrated storage space
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The Devasa's staircase has integrated storage space
The Devasa's bathroom includes a composting toilet and sink 
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The Devasa's bathroom includes a composting toilet and sink 
The Devasa's bathroom also includes a shower
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The Devasa's bathroom also includes a shower
The Devasa has around 300 sq ft (28 sq m) of floorspace
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The Devasa has around 300 sq ft (28 sq m) of floorspace
The Devasa's interior includes a snug living room area a kitchen, and a bathroom
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The Devasa's interior includes a snug living room area a kitchen, and a bathroom
The Devasa's upstairs is reached by storage-integrated staircase
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The Devasa's upstairs is reached by storage-integrated staircase
The Devasa, shown with the roof in the raised position
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The Devasa, shown with the roof in the raised position
The Devasa, shown with the roof in the lowered position
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The Devasa, shown with the roof in the lowered position
The big idea behind the Devasa is that it's easy to tow in the lowered position, but when parked, it can expand upward and offer additional headroom
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The big idea behind the Devasa is that it's easy to tow in the lowered position, but when parked, it can expand upward and offer additional headroom

We've covered a few tiny houses with slide-outs, but the Devasa is the first we've seen that slides up. The novel home, from Tiny Houses NYC, can increase in height to provide more headspace when it's not being towed, much like a camper van with a pop-up roof.

The big benefit with the Devasa is that when in the lowered position, it'll be easy (and legal) to tow, but when parked up, it can expand upward and offer lots of headroom, meaning no crawling around in a loft space like most tiny houses. It measures 23.5 ft (7.16 m)-long and 12.5 ft (3.81 m)-tall when in the lowered position and 17 ft (5.1 m)-tall when raised, offering an impressive 6.5 ft (2 m)-high ceilings upstairs.

The interior comprises roughly 300 sq ft (28 sq m) of floorspace and has a fairly standard tiny house layout, with a snug living room area near the entrance, a kitchen with no appliances yet installed, and a bathroom that includes a shower, sink, and composting toilet.

There are two bedrooms upstairs reached by storage-integrated staircase. Of course, even with the extending roof you can't install tall wardrobes or the like up there or you'd need to move them when traveling, so all you're really gaining with a system like this is the headroom. That said, as someone who has traveled much of Europe stooped over in a camper van, this writer can attest that headroom is a good benefit to have.

The Devasa's interior includes a snug living room area, a kitchen and a bathroom
The Devasa's interior includes a snug living room area, a kitchen and a bathroom

The raising roof system, well, raises some concerns – such as how it works, if it could fall and crush someone, if it's stable in high winds, and if it'll stand up to repeated use. Slide-outs are known for leaking and are prone to failure when not well-built or properly maintained, for example.

A Tiny Houses NYC representative told us that the system runs from a 12 V car battery attached to a motor by the trailer's tongue that operates four individual screw jacks on each corner. The rep also indicated that the roof can be operated manually if required and would not fall if the system failed, but as of writing wasn't able to give us any more specific information.

The Devasa is up for sale. We've no word on its price but those interested can get in touch with the firm directly for more information. Check out the video below to see it in action.

Source: Tiny Houses NYC

Two Story Tiny House on Wheels Part 1

4 comments
guzmanchinky
I know these are all the rage, but where do you put them??? RV parks don't allow them, not sure you can just park them anywhere? And why not just buy a really nice RV?
robert96
If you check the video, the price is starting at $125,000. As for the upper floor falling down onto the lower one, it can't. Since it is using screw jacks there is no way for the upper floor to disconnect from the lower floor for it to be able to fall. Each corner has a metal attachment that is corse threaded and the screw itself is attached to the bottom floor (or the other way around, either can be true). Cheers!
toyhouse
That thing must be like towing the titanic! You'll need a serious tow rig and it's gonna cost you in fuel to take it anywhere. Once you get there - you're probably going to be staying awhile. I'm guessing it's no fun towing that thing over a mountain pass. For those who like the tiny house style, it's a matter of personal taste and can't be argued with. Folks think they're cute and like the mostly conventional home construction. If you're wanting to re-locate a bit more often, a conventional rv is a smarter way to go. They may not be as cute outside, but the prices are reasonable and they're made for towing and living in. Our two cents of course.
Leonard Foster Jr
Cool ideal over priced Yes, people do your research most builds like this are never moved once in place or stays in place for an extended amount of time Yes Rv parks take them in? Next these homes are built like a real home, i have lived in a motor home for up to five years and things just are not made to take day in day out type of use.