Medical

Diabetes cured in mice. Are we next?

The new technique cures diabetes in mice by bypassing the immune system that attacks beta cells
The new technique cures diabetes in mice by bypassing the immune system that attacks beta cells
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Bruno Doiron  (left), and Ralph DeFronzo  co-invented a technique that has cured diabetes in mice for one year without side effects
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Bruno Doiron  (left), and Ralph DeFronzo  co-invented a technique that has cured diabetes in mice for one year without side effects
The new technique cures diabetes in mice by bypassing the immune system that attacks beta cells
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The new technique cures diabetes in mice by bypassing the immune system that attacks beta cells

According to the Center for Disease Control, 1.25 million people suffer from type 1 diabetes in the US alone. So far, it can only be managed with diet and regular doses of insulin, but scientists at UT Health San Antonio have invented a way of curing the disease in mice that may one day do the same for humans even with type 2 diabetes.

Type 1 diabetes is a particularly unpleasant condition. It occurs when the pancreas ceases to produce the insulin needed by the body to metabolize sugar and, until the invention of artificial insulin injections, it was as deadly as cancer. Type 2 is the less severe form of the disease, where the body produces insufficient insulin; it can often be managed through diet alone.

Surprisingly, diabetes is an autoimmune disease. Insulin is made by specialized cells in the pancreas, called beta cells, and sometimes the body's immune system turns against itself and attacks these beta cells, destroying them. Diabetes results when this destruction is over 80 percent.

Invented by Bruno Doiron and Ralph DeFronzo, the UT Health technique uses gene transfer to alter cells in the pancreases of mice to make them think they're beta cells and start making insulin. This involves taking selected genes from external beta cells and using viruses as carriers to move them into the new host cells, in the diabetic pancreas.

Bruno Doiron  (left), and Ralph DeFronzo  co-invented a technique that has cured diabetes in mice for one year without side effects
Bruno Doiron  (left), and Ralph DeFronzo  co-invented a technique that has cured diabetes in mice for one year without side effects

According to DeFronzo, the altered cells then produce insulin, but only in the presence of sugar, which is how a functioning beta cell is supposed to work. Otherwise, the cells would just keep cranking out the hormone, metabolizing all the sugar in the bloodstream and causing hypoglycemia.

Only about 20 percent of the lost cells need to be replaced, but if new beta cells are simply introduced, it's likely that the body would attack and destroy them as well. One big advantage of this technique is that it works around the autoimmune system, which ignores the altered cells.

"If a type 1 diabetic has been living with these cells for 30, 40 or 50 years, and all we're getting them to do is secrete insulin, we expect there to be no adverse immune response," says DeFronzo.

The team emphasizes that there is a large gap between curing diabetic mice and achieving the same in human beings. They say that they'd like to start clinical trials in three years, but more animal testing is needed first at a cost of about US$5 million, as well as making an application to the US Food and Drug Administration for investigational new drug approval.

"It worked perfectly," says Doiron. "We cured mice for one year without any side effects. That's never been seen. But it's a mouse model, so caution is needed. We want to bring this to large animals that are closer to humans in physiology of the endocrine system."

Source: UT Health

2 comments
zr2s10
This is great, I hope my dad sees this in his lifetime. Type I since he was a teenager. He's actually pretty lucky, and has a good handle on his. But my uncle who hasn't, honestly, taken proper care of himself, has had numerous complications from the disease. Most people think it's "just take a shot, and they'll be fine", but there's so much more than that. Fingers crossed!
TJG
It has been known since the 70s that Type 1 Diabetes is an autoimmune disease. Also Type 2 if NOT a less severe form of diabetes. It is an entirely different syndrome. In fact, it is much more complex in that there are 3 or 4 different mechanisms that can be at work in varying combinations and degrees. These mechanisms can vary over the life of the patient. This makes treating and eventually finding a cure are much more complicated than for Type 1. All diabetes is innately progressive so most people with type 2 will eventually need some form of medication, including possibly insulin, to control it. About 90% of all diabetes is type 2, so the impact is far greater. Type 2 can go unrecognized for decades. One can have enough insulin to live, but not in the best health. It is not at all uncommon for a person to be diagnosed after presentation of a diabetes specific complication. Now days, many doctors do a blood glucose test as part of a regular check up, so more people are being diagnosed sooner. Having Type 1 myself, I sure hope this does lead to a cure, but I'll believe it when I see it. Two things I've learned following like this one for most of my life: This is a REALLY good era to be a mouse with diabetes and mice are not people. Cheers!