Tiny Houses

Elevate puts a tiny house on a pedestal

In order to raise funds to move the Elevate project forward, a Kickstarter campaign has been launched
In order to raise funds to move the Elevate project forward, a Kickstarter campaign has been launched
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The Elevate prototype structure could appeal to fans of both tiny houses and treehouse
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The Elevate prototype structure could appeal to fans of both tiny houses and treehouse
Elevate is raised between 8 - 12 ft (2.4 - 3.6 m) off the ground on a pedestal, that's enough room to park a car underneath
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Elevate is raised between 8 - 12 ft (2.4 - 3.6 m) off the ground on a pedestal, that's enough room to park a car underneath
The greenery-covered dwelling boasts optional solar panels and a rainwater collection system
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The greenery-covered dwelling boasts optional solar panels and a rainwater collection system
In order to raise funds to move the Elevate project forward, a Kickstarter campaign has been launched
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In order to raise funds to move the Elevate project forward, a Kickstarter campaign has been launched
Elevate would be prefabricated off-site and its foundations secured with micropiles and spot footing foundations
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Elevate would be prefabricated off-site and its foundations secured with micropiles and spot footing foundations
Sustainable design and technology slated for Elevate includes living walls
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Sustainable design and technology slated for Elevate includes living walls
The structure boasts optional solar panels and a rooftop-based rainwater collection system that stores captured water in the pedestal
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The structure boasts optional solar panels and a rooftop-based rainwater collection system that stores captured water in the pedestal
Founder Nathan Toothman told Gizmag that while the aim is to run off-grid, this will depend on what Elevate is being used for
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Founder Nathan Toothman told Gizmag that while the aim is to run off-grid, this will depend on what Elevate is being used for
Access is gained via stairs or ramps, or through a small elevator in the pedestal structure (itself accessed by a front door)
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Access is gained via stairs or ramps, or through a small elevator in the pedestal structure (itself accessed by a front door)
The greenery-covered dwelling boasts optional solar panels and a rainwater collection system
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The greenery-covered dwelling boasts optional solar panels and a rainwater collection system
Constructed from wood, steel, and concrete, Elevate would be prefabricated off-site
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Constructed from wood, steel, and concrete, Elevate would be prefabricated off-site
Elevate comes in a few different iterations, so its interior floorspace can measure between 250 - 400 sq ft (23 - 3 sq m)
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Elevate comes in a few different iterations, so its interior floorspace can measure between 250 - 400 sq ft (23 - 3 sq m)
Architectural render of the tiny structure
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Architectural render of the tiny structure
Its creators envision the structure serving as a cafe, drive-thru, office space, and even homeless shelter
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Its creators envision the structure serving as a cafe, drive-thru, office space, and even homeless shelter

Honolulu, Hawaii-based firm Elevate recently unveiled an eponymous prototype structure that could appeal to fans of tiny houses and treehouses alike. Raised between 8 - 12 ft (2.4 - 3.6 m) on a wooden pedestal, the greenery-covered dwelling features a partially shaded space to park a car underneath, and boasts solar panels and a rainwater collection system.

Elevate is planned in a few different iterations, so its interior floorspace will measure between 250 - 400 sq ft (23 - 37 sq m), depending on what it's going to be used for. Its creators envision it serving as a cafe, drive-thru, office space, and even homeless shelter.

However, the firm rightly mentions its use as a micro-home first. Indeed, rather than the aforementioned ideas, Elevate seems best suited to serving as a tiny home, and its relatively unusual design could possibly appeal to young professional types.

Elevate comes in a few different iterations, so its interior floorspace can measure between 250 - 400 sq ft (23 - 3 sq m)
Elevate comes in a few different iterations, so its interior floorspace can measure between 250 - 400 sq ft (23 - 3 sq m)

Interior layout is again flexible, but the tiny house layout depicted for Elevate comprises a main living space, with a small toilet and shower area taking up a corner nook. A large couch/bed is situated in the center of the room, while a small kitchenette runs along one wall.

Access is gained via stairs or ramp, or through a small elevator in the pedestal structure. Sustainable design and technology slated for Elevate includes, most obviously, the greenery-covered outer walls, while optional solar panels and a rooftop-based rainwater collection system that stores water in the pedestal area are also planned. The rooftop can optionally be used as a deck area. too.

Elevate is constructed from wood, steel, and concrete, and its foundations are secured with micropiles and spot footing foundations (the team was founded by engineers who specialize in foundation work, so it should be well-secured). Because the structure is raised, it's reported less susceptible to storms and flooding than ground-based buildings.

The structure boasts optional solar panels and a rooftop-based rainwater collection system that stores captured water in the pedestal
The structure boasts optional solar panels and a rooftop-based rainwater collection system that stores captured water in the pedestal

Elevate co-founder Nathan Toothman told Gizmag that while the aim is to run units off-grid, this will depend on what Elevate is being used for. If businesses had high air-conditioning and refrigeration demands, for example, then the solar power would likely go toward reducing the grid-based electricity needs.

It's early days yet though and there's still a way to go until you can order a prefabricated Elevate tiny house/cafe/drive thru. To help raise funds and try to get to that point, Toothman and team have launched a Kickstarter campaign.

Backer rewards on offer include Elevate t-shirts for US$25 each, a tour of the Elevate prototype in Hawaii for $2,500 and, at the top end of the scale, $10,000 to design an Elevate floor plan to be named after the pledger.

Check out the pitch video below for a look at Elevate in its tiny house guise.

Sources: Elevate, Kickstarter

ELEVATE: Innovative, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Structures

4 comments
RonRedman
Extremely cool site Adam, glad I found it! Keep up the great, (and important) work. Thanks
Randolph Garrison
A very clever design! Personally I would prefer (given location) a garage for the small car, four corner lifts, and a small ship brow that could be raised, lowered, and positioned or used as a patio. This modification would give protection aginest flooding.
McDesign
A Company called Logangate used (?) to sell a pedestal-mounted vacation home kit for areas with steep terrain and short building seasons. I had them design and build a more conventional panelized house.
DavidB
That is, without question, the worst Kickstarter campaign promo video I've seen yet: about 0:07, total, in two shots of the house's exterior; about 0:20 of call to action; about 1:20 of Hawaiian Bureau of Tourism footage. Why not show some 3D renderings, floor plans, tech features? Why not talk about the vision, the potential benefits, the challenges? It comes across as shady...and not in a protected-from-the-sun way.