Bicycles

FitRider bike puts those lazy arms to use

FitRider bike puts those lazy ...
The FitRider lets cyclists propel themselves using both leg and arm power
The FitRider lets cyclists propel themselves using both leg and arm power
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The FitRider lets cyclists propel themselves using both leg and arm power
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The FitRider lets cyclists propel themselves using both leg and arm power
In its current form, the FitRider also features a suspension fork, 700C wheels, and a 14-speed drivetrain
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In its current form, the FitRider also features a suspension fork, 700C wheels, and a 14-speed drivetrain

Much as cycling is a good source of exercise for the lower body and the core, it admittedly doesn't do much for the upper body. We've seen a number of attempts to address this shortcoming, mostly in the form of bikes that are pedaled with both the legs and the arms. The FitRider takes a somewhat different approach, looking somewhat like a cross between a regular bicycle and a NordicTrack.

Instead of traditional handlebars, the FitRider has two vertical ski pole-like levers that extend down to the pedals, and which pivot in the middle where they meet the aluminum frame. Each one is connected to its respective pedal via a steel rod, allowing arm power applied to the levers to augment the leg power that's applied to the pedals.

If the rider's arms get tired, they can disconnect those rods and secure them to an anchoring point on the frame, locking the levers in a more traditional non-pivoting configuration. They can still turn from side to side, however, to facilitate steering.

In its current form, the FitRider also features a suspension fork, 700C wheels, and a 14-speed drivetrain.

Its creators, Bill Capek and Abraham Mathew, are now in the process of raising production funds on Kickstarter. A pledge of US$1,800 will get you one, when and if they're ready to go. The estimated retail price is $2,199.

You can see the bike in action, in the pitch video below.

Source: Kickstarter

14 comments
14 comments
Cody Blank
LOL. For that kind of money you can get a carbon road bike, a decent mountain bike, or a couple years gym membership. And that's not even factoring in how ridiculous you'd look on this bike.
Tony Morris
It doesn't look like you can add propulsion with your arms. That would require pushing with one hand while pulling on the other - which would turn the steering!
Adrien
UM... they don't say how you even steer the thing, but even if you have to twist the handlebars (which is what it looks like), this thing will be dangerous as hell.
martinkopplow
This type of bikes gets 'invented' about once a year. (http://www.gizmag.com/all-limb-bicycling-raxibo/23160/ and http://www.gizmag.com/varibike-arm-leg-powered-bicycle/28811/ for example) It has been proven by its predecessors, though, that a rider can exhaust all the energy his metabolism is able to produce by using the legs alone. The arms will not add to the cycling peformance.
If there is an effect, then it is the excercise alone. The tradeoff is saftey, it appears, and a big loss in versatility and simplicity, which is a key factor for a bicycle. Excercising the upper body could also be accomplished easier and in a more balanced manner by other means.
I have not much confidence in the Kickstarter campaign.
Slowburn
Just another stupid way to get yourself killed.
wle
wow the 1000th time this has been ''invented'' stupid heavy expensive adding arms doesnt; make you any faster which is why you never see these stupid things on the road
wle
wle
surely one can find a better way to ''workout'' the ''lazy arms'' than this awful kludge-bike
wle
windykites
As usual, way too expensive. Cheaper to buy a separate cross trainer. @Tony Morris, it looks like it can be steered. Did you watch the video?
If your arms get tired, just let the handlebars move by themselves. Why have to disconnect them?
RussellD
This is a bad idea badly implemented; no thanks to Gizmag for informing me - this is a waste of my time. This is marginally better: http://www.rowbike.com/
Jon Smith
Russell,
Thank you! I had a serious chuckle after clicking the link you provided. The Rowbike is funny rather than the just sad FitRider.
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