Automotive

Hyundai launches its first electric double-decker bus

Hyundai launches its first ele...
Hyundai Motor says that the development of its first electric double-decker bus is part of the company’s effort to help reduce traffic congestion and air pollution
Hyundai Motor says that the development of its first electric double-decker bus is part of the company’s effort to help reduce traffic congestion and air pollution
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Hyundai Motor's new electric double-decker bus can seat up to 70 passengers
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Hyundai Motor's new electric double-decker bus can seat up to 70 passengers
The double-decker's 384 kWh water-cooled polymer battery offers 300 km (186.4 mi) of all-electric range
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The double-decker's 384 kWh water-cooled polymer battery offers 300 km (186.4 mi) of all-electric range
Hyundai Motor says that the development of its first electric double-decker bus is part of the company’s effort to help reduce traffic congestion and air pollution
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Hyundai Motor says that the development of its first electric double-decker bus is part of the company’s effort to help reduce traffic congestion and air pollution
The Hyundai Motor electric double decker's batteries can be fully recharged in just 72 minutes
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The Hyundai Motor electric double decker's batteries can be fully recharged in just 72 minutes
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Back in 2016, Chinese electric vehicle maker BYD rolled out a 10.2 meter-long electric double-decker bus in London. Now transit companies have got a new emissions-free people carrier to help ease inner city air pollution and traffic congestion thanks to Hyundai Motor.

Hyundai's 12.9 m (42.3 ft) long and 3.99 m (13.1 ft) high electric double-decker was launched at Korea's Land, Infrastructure and Transport Technology Fair yesterday, after spending 18 months in the making.

"The double-decker electric bus is an environmentally friendly vehicle optimized for global eco-friendly trends," said the company's ByoungWoo Hwang. "This will not only ultimately improve the air quality, but also contribute greatly to easing commuting hour traffic congestion by accommodating more passengers."

It can haul 70 seated passengers – with 11 seats on the lower deck and 59 on the upper deck – and though Hyundai doesn't mention standing capacity, there does seem to be potential for ferrying around more than the 81 full load of the electric buses that entered service in London in 2016. An automatic sliding ramp will deploy to welcome wheelchair users aboard, where two dedicated spaces await.

Hyundai Motor's new electric double-decker bus can seat up to 70 passengers
Hyundai Motor's new electric double-decker bus can seat up to 70 passengers

The double-decker features a 384 kWh water-cooled polymer battery for 300 km (186.4 mi) of all-electric range, with a full recharge taking just 72 minutes. Hyundai says that the combination of a 240 kW wheel motor axle and motor in the second axle will make for a more efficient ride, while independent suspension on the first driving axle should offer more comfort during travel.

To help drivers better navigate busy city streets, the double-decker's steering system sees both front and rear wheels able to turn. And onboard safety systems include Forward Collision-Avoidance Assist, Lane Keeping Assist and Vehicle Dynamic Control.

Source: Hyundai

View gallery - 4 images
4 comments
Simon Redford
Looks interesting, but we could do with more detail. 300km range on 384kWh charge sounds impressive, but is this full load, is it normal bus stop-start operation, does this include air conditioning and heating? The full recharge in 72 minutes implies 460kW charge rate, but presumably charging at this rate will create some quite big losses? However, electric busses are clearly to be welcomed on city streets.
What is becoming more evident with all the figures bouncing around for electric vehicle performance and charging rates is the need for an agreed and regulated methodology to identify the true energy use per passenger mile in typical driving environments for the different classes of vehicle. I’m sure electric busses will be impressively low, but such a methodology needs to identify energy requirements for customer comfort in a typical city environment as well as the energy required for motion
Expanded Viewpoint
Oh, "emissions free", eh?? What about all of the emissions from the power plants that provide the electricity that charges these things up? Are they pulling electricity out of the aether or what? How about all of the emissions from the trucks and other equipment that mine and process all of the materials that are needed for those batteries? The extra copper needed for the motors comes out of the ground too, doesn't it?
Randy
windykites
Randy, quite a lot of electricity is generated by wind and solar. Your reply is rather pessimistic. Everything has to be built, but after that the benefits are there. I guess you would rather that everyone walked or cycled?
2hung2b
Looks like there's a fair amount of real estate on the roof. Maybe some solar panels would help with the range numbers. Didn't notice any mention of that in the article.