Robotics

Hyundai beefs up robotic exoskeleton

Hyundai beefs up robotic exosk...
Hyundai's new exoskeleton in testing
Hyundai's new exoskeleton in testing
View 7 Images
Hyundai's new exoskeleton looks pretty badass
1/7
Hyundai's new exoskeleton looks pretty badass
Hyundai's new exoskeleton: hand controls
2/7
Hyundai's new exoskeleton: hand controls
Hyundai's new exoskeleton in testing
3/7
Hyundai's new exoskeleton in testing
Hyundai's new exoskeleton would allow a human wearer to lift more than 60kg in its current pre-production spec
4/7
Hyundai's new exoskeleton would allow a human wearer to lift more than 60kg in its current pre-production spec
Hyundai's new exoskeleton: a human straps in to wear and control the suit
5/7
Hyundai's new exoskeleton: a human straps in to wear and control the suit
Hyundai is also working on a beefier lower-body exoskeleton for mobility support
6/7
Hyundai is also working on a beefier lower-body exoskeleton for mobility support
Hyundai sees exoskeletons as part of a wider mix of mobility technology that will form a big market in the near future
7/7
Hyundai sees exoskeletons as part of a wider mix of mobility technology that will form a big market in the near future
View gallery - 7 images

Following on from a small, discreet mobility exoskeleton it unveiled last year, Korean auto giant Hyundai has revealed images of a much beefier, tougher looking robotic exoskeleton aimed at the transportation, industrial and military markets. The suit, which is still in its pre-production form, would let you lift and manipulate objects weighing over 60 kg (132 lb) with no stress to your legs, arms or back.

Like many Japanese car companies, Korean giant Hyundai Motor Group is experimenting with all sorts of mobility technology that goes way beyond just cars. Last year, Hyundai unveiled the H-LEX, a miniature exoskeleton focused on keeping frail, elderly and disabled people as mobile as possible. H-LEX was quite a discreet looking augmentation, weighing between 11 and 12 kg (24 and 26 lb) and drawing power from a small backpack.

Now, the company has released shots of something far meatier and more industrial through its blog site. Although the site makes it clear that the Iron Man suit was an inspiration, this one looks to have more in common with the yellow number Ripley used to take out the Xenomorph Queen trash in Aliens.

Hyundai's new exoskeleton looks pretty badass
Hyundai's new exoskeleton looks pretty badass

Whatever the inspiration, this blue beastie gives a human wearer the ability to lift and manipulate objects as heavy as 60 kg (132 lb). The wearer straps in and controls the suit with normal body movements. Special hand controls give you grip and lift capability with what appears to be a pair of grasping claws.

Hyundai's new exoskeleton: hand controls
Hyundai's new exoskeleton: hand controls

Other shots show a new legs-only mobility exoskeleton; a chunkier, heavy-lift and less discreet version of the H-LEX perhaps, that's even capable of climbing up and down staircases.

Hyundai is also working on a beefier lower-body exoskeleton for mobility support
Hyundai is also working on a beefier lower-body exoskeleton for mobility support

Hyundai is aiming for commercialization for the device, and is already touting its potential in the military, industrial and physical rehabilitation markets. Thanks to a plethora of other robotic exoskeleton designs, though, there could be plenty of competition. It's certainly looking like your first ride in a robo-suit may not be that far away.

Source: Hyundai Motor Group

View gallery - 7 images
4 comments
JamesDemello
Thats some backpack. Batteries are such a downer.
Wolf0579
C'Mon, guys! Go for Broke, and build the loader from "Aliens"
Marco Gonzalez
That "yellow number" is called a Power Loader. http://avp.wikia.com/wiki/Caterpillar_P-5000_Work_Loader
Stephen N Russell
mass produce or lisc to build in the US, nice. Must for Construction & warehouses alone & Rescue,