Tiny Houses

Koda tiny house sheds some weight and floats on water

Koda tiny house sheds some wei...
The Koda Light Float is installed on a pontoon base made by Top Marine
The Koda Light Float is installed on a pontoon base made by Top Marine
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The Koda Light Float is installed on a pontoon base made by Top Marine
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The Koda Light Float is installed on a pontoon base made by Top Marine
The Koda Light Float is envisioned as harbor café, artist studio, or a vacation home
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The Koda Light Float is envisioned as harbor café, artist studio, or a vacation home
The Koda Light Float measures 25.8 sq m (277 sq ft)
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The Koda Light Float measures 25.8 sq m (277 sq ft)
The Koda Light Float  can be finished in wood or zinc
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The Koda Light Float  can be finished in wood or zinc
The Koda Light Float is a lightweight floating take on the concrete Koda micro-home that hit the market back in 2017
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The Koda Light Float is a lightweight floating take on the concrete Koda micro-home that hit the market back in 2017
The Koda Light Float is available in Europe, but we've no word on pricing
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The Koda Light Float is available in Europe, but we've no word on pricing
A ladder leads up to the Koda Light Float's rooftop area
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A ladder leads up to the Koda Light Float's rooftop area
The interior pictured is of the Koda Light but designer Kodasema assures us it is identical to the Koda Light Float
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The interior pictured is of the Koda Light but designer Kodasema assures us it is identical to the Koda Light Float
The kitchen area of the Koda Light model, which is reported identical to that of the Koda Light Float
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The kitchen area of the Koda Light model, which is reported identical to that of the Koda Light Float
The bathroom of the Koda Light model, which is reported identical to that of the Koda Light Float
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The bathroom of the Koda Light model, which is reported identical to that of the Koda Light Float
The Koda Light model's shower, which is reported identical to that of the Koda Light Float
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The Koda Light model's shower, which is reported identical to that of the Koda Light Float
Stairs lead up to the Koda Light model's bedroom. The Koda Light Float has an identical layout.
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Stairs lead up to the Koda Light model's bedroom. The Koda Light Float has an identical layout.
The open living area with sofa of the Koda Light model, which is reported identical to that of the Koda Light Float
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The open living area with sofa of the Koda Light model, which is reported identical to that of the Koda Light Float
The kitchen area of the Koda Light model has a small breakfast bar, which is reported identical to that of the Koda Light Float
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The kitchen area of the Koda Light model has a small breakfast bar, which is reported identical to that of the Koda Light Float

Regular readers may remember the Koda, an attractive concrete tiny house that hit the market in 2017. Designer Kodasema recently followed it up with the Koda Light Float, a model with similar styling that's made from timber instead of concrete, and is installed on a pontoon.

The Koda Light Float weighs around 10 tons (8.9 tonnes), compared to the original Koda's 29.8 tons (26.6 tonnes) and is envisioned as a waterfront cafe, artist's studio, or vacation home. It can be clad in multiple finishes, including wood and zinc. A ladder affixed to the exterior provides access to the roof.

The Koda Light Float is envisioned as harbor café, artist studio, or a vacation home
The Koda Light Float is envisioned as harbor café, artist studio, or a vacation home

Its interior measures 25.8 sq m (277 sq ft) and looks relatively spacious and light-filled, thanks to the generous glazing that fronts the home and its 10.9 ft (3.3 m)-high ceiling.

Visitors enter into an open plan ground floor that contains a living room area and a kitchen with breakfast bar and storage space. To the left of the kitchen lies a bathroom with toilet, shower, and sink. Back in the main living area, stairs lead up to the bedroom, which has enough space for a double bed.

The interior pictured is of the Koda Light but designer Kodasema assures us it is identical to the Koda Light Float
The interior pictured is of the Koda Light but designer Kodasema assures us it is identical to the Koda Light Float

The Koda Light Float gets power and water from standard hookups, though Kodasema will wire it up ready for solar power to be added by a local firm. Interestingly, if circumstances change for some reason, the tiny house can be separated from the pontoon and installed on land.

Kodasema also offers two other very similar models. The Koda Light, which is identical to the Light Float but without the pontoon base (indeed, the interior photo above is actually of a Koda Light), plus the Koda Light Extended, which increases the floorspace.

We've no word on the pricing and availability is limited to Europe for now, though Kodasema aims to offer the Koda range in the US too.

Source: Kodasema

3 comments
AndrewCooper
How much deck area is on the "back" side? Wouldn't you want that big window, and the deck space, to have a view of the water instead of the dock?
guzmanchinky
Part of me has always thought how cool a floating home would be, but I'm guessing the constant motion from passing boats, even slight, would get annoying. And the cold (unless you're in Miami) since it's always quite a bit cooler on the water. But if I did, I'd want my house to look like this. But maybe a bigger bed than a double.
Nik
This style of home is popular in Holland, and in some places that are prone to flooding, but they are usually restrained by fixed piles, that allow vertical movement due to tides, rather than every passing boats wake. For use anywhere north of the Cote d'Azure, I'd want to know a lot more about its insulation, and weather resistance, particularly frost, and ice, and as its built of wood, its anti bug and fungus treatment. I dont see any reference to methods of heating, and non are visible, so that too is a big question, if its intended for year round habitation. Also flat horizontal roofs are prone water puddling, and consequent leakage. There are a variety of solutions to water living, from boats to converted barges, that are well suited to it, but just taking a land dwelling and sticking it on a pontoon doesn't really match those requirements.