3D Printing

IKEA-inspired MM1 looks to future-proof 3D printing

MakerMex's MM1 3D printer is designed to be easily upgraded as the technology advances
MakerMex's MM1 3D printer is designed to be easily upgraded as the technology advances
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With a print area of 20 x 20 x 20 cm (7.9 x 7.9 x 7.9 in) printing, the MM1 itself measures 49 x 37.5 x 49 cm (20 x 15 x 20 in)
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With a print area of 20 x 20 x 20 cm (7.9 x 7.9 x 7.9 in) printing, the MM1 itself measures 49 x 37.5 x 49 cm (20 x 15 x 20 in)
With a print area of 20 x 20 x 20 cm (7.9 x 7.9 x 7.9 in) printing, the MM1 itself measures 49 x 37.5 x 49 cm (20 x 15 x 20 in)
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With a print area of 20 x 20 x 20 cm (7.9 x 7.9 x 7.9 in) printing, the MM1 itself measures 49 x 37.5 x 49 cm (20 x 15 x 20 in)
The device can be further customized with add-ons such as Wi-Fi modules, auto-leveling beds, heating beds, acrylic enclosed walls and extra extruders
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The device can be further customized with add-ons such as Wi-Fi modules, auto-leveling beds, heating beds, acrylic enclosed walls and extra extruders
Materials the MM1 is capable of printing include ceramic, Play-Doh, batter, rubber, plastics and conductive material
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Materials the MM1 is capable of printing include ceramic, Play-Doh, batter, rubber, plastics and conductive material
The device can be further customized with add-ons such as Wi-Fi modules, auto-leveling beds, heating beds, acrylic enclosed walls and extra extruders
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The device can be further customized with add-ons such as Wi-Fi modules, auto-leveling beds, heating beds, acrylic enclosed walls and extra extruders
Materials the MM1 is capable of printing include ceramic, Play-Doh, batter, rubber, plastics and conductive material
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Materials the MM1 is capable of printing include ceramic, Play-Doh, batter, rubber, plastics and conductive material
MakerMex's MM1 3D printer is designed to be easily upgraded as the technology advances
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MakerMex's MM1 3D printer is designed to be easily upgraded as the technology advances
Materials the MM1 is capable of printing include ceramic, Play-Doh, batter, rubber, plastics and conductive material
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Materials the MM1 is capable of printing include ceramic, Play-Doh, batter, rubber, plastics and conductive material
MakerMex's MM1 3D printer is designed to be easily upgraded as the technology advances
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MakerMex's MM1 3D printer is designed to be easily upgraded as the technology advances
Materials the MM1 is capable of printing include ceramic, Play-Doh, batter, rubber, plastics and conductive material
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Materials the MM1 is capable of printing include ceramic, Play-Doh, batter, rubber, plastics and conductive material
The device can be further customized with add-ons such as Wi-Fi modules, auto-leveling beds, heating beds, acrylic enclosed walls and extra extruders
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The device can be further customized with add-ons such as Wi-Fi modules, auto-leveling beds, heating beds, acrylic enclosed walls and extra extruders
Materials the MM1 is capable of printing include ceramic, Play-Doh, batter, rubber, plastics and conductive material
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Materials the MM1 is capable of printing include ceramic, Play-Doh, batter, rubber, plastics and conductive material
MakerMex's MM1 3D printer is designed to be easily upgraded as the technology advances
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MakerMex's MM1 3D printer is designed to be easily upgraded as the technology advances
Materials the MM1 is capable of printing include ceramic, Play-Doh, batter, rubber, plastics and conductive material
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Materials the MM1 is capable of printing include ceramic, Play-Doh, batter, rubber, plastics and conductive material

3D printing sure is definitely a rapidly evolving field. While fast moving technologies that emerge in this way can lead to huge amounts of obsolete devices, 3D printer company MakerMex is seeking to produce something with a little more staying power in the form of a multi-material 3D printer called the MM1. The device features a modular design that enables the owner to swap components in and out as required.

MakerMex may be Mexico's first 3D printer manufacturing company, but it's not the first to look into modular printers. The Snap 3D Printer made steps in this area last year, though a failed crowdfunding campaign meant that it never made it to market. The R-360, also launched last year, is a modular, easily transportable 3D printer with upgradeable parts. But what sets the MM1 apart, at least in the eyes of MakerMex, is its big emphasis on customization, along with interchangeable extrusion heads that allow for easy transition between printing materials.

"We’re modeling this printer after the automotive industry, or even like IKEA, in the sense that we’re providing a unique, customizable experience for those interested in 3D printing," says Sam Weatherly, owner of MakerMex. "Because it prints with multiple extrusion options in many different materials, the MM1 really is the perfect printer for just about anyone. You can print with chocolate one minute and PLA plastic the next."

With a print area of 20 x 20 x 20 cm (7.9 x 7.9 x 7.9 in), the MM1 itself measures 49 x 37.5 x 49 cm (20 x 15 x 20 in) and is capable of printing in materials including ceramic, Play-Doh, batter, rubber, plastics and conductive materials. MakerMex gives a 300 mm/s print speed and 30 micron layer resolution for the unit, which can be further customized with add-ons, such as Wi-Fi modules, auto-leveling beds, heating beds, acrylic enclosed walls and extra extruders.

The thinking behind this versatility is two-fold: that owners of the MM1 won't need to replace it any time soon; and that the range of compatible materials will see it used in a variety of 3D printing applications, thus widening its appeal.

MakerMex is looking to raise US$50,000 on Kickstarter to enter production. The campaign will launch on October 2, with pledges for the MM1 to be set at $999.

Update 2 Oct 2014: The MMI Kickstarter campaign is now live, the pitch video is below.

Source: MakerMex

4 comments
Bob Flint
What is the medium it uses to print 300mm (almost 1 foot) per second?
attoman
The idea of extended life through upgrades and add ons is nothing more then a sales ploy! Show one printer 2D or 3D that has actually seen such a method work. Tech moves on and the next real improvement never works in the old machine. After all this the company that told you in the article above you could change from ink to batter in a minute.
thetruthisoutthere
attoman knows little about the product, clearly. The paste extrusion head is independent of any heated extrusion head so swapping is faster than using the same head with a different filament. Sorry buddy, your failed argument doesn't fly here. So should we tell Kitchenaid their sales ploy to extend the usefulness of their mixers is a crock? Or tell Ninja their accessories for their home blenders isn't feasible? Talk about close-minded. Why is it so terrible to want to see the first success of a modular 3D printer? Who wouldn't want to see progress in this field, to make new options more affordable and readily available to consumers? If I was buying a 3D printer I'd want it to do more, not less.
thetruthisoutthere
Bob Flint - Likely PLA, as seen here by other printers on the market: www.youtube.com/watch?v=BcbNN2urKxM www.youtube.com/watch?v=bW66Nm2TpZs www.youtube.com/watch?v=oj3OfMdMJhs