Marine

eMogi kayak gives paddlers a 12-mph electric boost

eMogi kayak gives paddlers a 1...
The eMogi can reportedly run for up to seven hours per charge, although that's at its lowest speed
The eMogi can reportedly run for up to seven hours per charge, although that's at its lowest speed
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The eMogi has three forward speeds plus reverse – the top speed is 10.7 knots (12 mph or 20 km/h)
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The eMogi has three forward speeds plus reverse – the top speed is 10.7 knots (12 mph or 20 km/h)
The standard version of the eMogi has a composite hull
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The standard version of the eMogi has a composite hull
The eMogi's battery is stowed in the bow
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The eMogi's battery is stowed in the bow
A close look at the eMogi's propeller and rudder
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A close look at the eMogi's propeller and rudder
The eMogi can reportedly run for up to seven hours per charge, although that's at its lowest speed
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The eMogi can reportedly run for up to seven hours per charge, although that's at its lowest speed
View gallery - 5 images

While we have seen motorized kayaks before, most of them simply utilize an outboard motor, or they don't have the form factor of a true kayak. The Czech-made eMogi, however, looks fairly conventional, and has its own integrated electric motor.

Measuring 323 cm long by 70 cm wide (10 ft, 7 inches by 2 ft, 3.5 in), the sit-inside eMogi features a removable lithium-ion battery pack in the bow, a control panel and a telescopic steering wheel at the front of the cockpit, and a 1-kilowatt electric motor in the stern.

That motor spins up a propeller that protrudes more or less straight back from the keel. Users engage it using either a pushbutton on the steering wheel, or by pushing a button on the shaft of the included wirelessly linked paddle. The eMogi's steerable rudder is controlled either by pushing on foot braces inside the kayak, or by turning the steering wheel – and yes, the paddle can also be used.

A close look at the eMogi's propeller and rudder
A close look at the eMogi's propeller and rudder

There are three forward speeds plus reverse – the top speed is 10.7 knots (12 mph or 20 km/h). Buyers can choose between four battery capacities, with the highest (22.2 volts/1,340 Wh) reportedly being good for a runtime of up to seven hours per four- to five-hour charge. It should be noted, though, that figure is for the lowest speed setting. An extra battery can be stowed in a stern compartment, plus the kayak can of course still be paddled without the motor running at all.

According to its designers, the eMogi was initially designed for moving up rivers against the current. They add that it could now find use in applications such as getting anglers to fishing spots more quickly, marine research, emergency response, and opening kayaking up to people with limited physical abilities.

The standard version of the eMogi has a composite hull
The standard version of the eMogi has a composite hull

Should you be interested, a basic model with a 600-Wh battery will cost you €6,150 (about US$7,219). That particular setup is claimed to weigh 66.2 lb (30 kg).

The eMogi can be seen in use (unfortunately sans life jackets) in the video below.

eMogi Electric Kayak

Source: eMogi

View gallery - 5 images
8 comments
8 comments
Brian M
Given the attention to safety in the video (as you say sans life jackets), do wonder how safe that spinning propeller is given that kayaks
are not the most stable of craft, the difference between the user being in the kayak and being in the water is often seconds!
Control via a wireless switch on the paddle should just add to the easy fun of dicing your fingers and toes .
Definitely needs some sort of Deadman's switch, similar to a rib or power boat.

The other issue, water (especially sea water) and batteries are not good together (watched any submarine movies?) , are these nicely separated and sealed in watertight compartments.

But all said and done , where can I try one!

Booleanboy
$7k? It would be cheaper to hire someone else to do the paddling every time I went out!
Aross
I don't understand the price since a kayak of that size would be between 1 and 2 K$ and a small inboard electric motor and battery the same. To me the whole thing is way over prices. My second issue is that the propeller will be a constant drag if the motor is not used. This could be mostly solved by allowing the blades to fold back, but of course you would lose reverse. If that can't be alleviated then it should be converted to a regen capability so while paddling alone the batteries are recharged.
mediabeing
$7K, for a boat with unprotected prop?? Not for me, thanks.
Protect the prop from everything but water, and we'll talk.
LooseSends
Or you could just paddle and get the exercise you actually need. The other issue is weight. I can carry mine from the backyard, into the truck, strapped in, and down at the launch in 8 minutes. If it weighed much more it would be less likely to get used.

Then there's that eyewatering price and the anxiety when you hit shallow spots which eliminates half the opportunities to use it. No thanks.

Great for rescue or up-river daily runs for niche situations, otherwise it's a bunch of privileged tourists out once a year acting like idiots or getting themselves in bad situations.

Better idea is some sort of clip on outboard unit that's universal so you can use for those specific purposes imho.
WeiDalong
How about make an electric paddle that only works when submerged.
Yeah baby!
Ashtangakasha
The last video shows a folding prop, but the closeup of the prop in the still photos above shows it definitely doesn't fold. In any case, this rig looks dangerous to swimmers or capsized paddlers, and too expensive and heavy to make much sense as an electric kayak. Turn it into a slightly larger, more practical boat, or leave the kayaking to kayakers. For some unusual situations perhaps it's good for emergency use, but I would think in most rescue scenarios stability would be a high priority -- e.g., a canoe with an outrigger.
TomLeeM
I think that is neat and green. I would add some small stabilizing pods on / near the back so it would be more stable. Perhaps use it to 'tow' non-powered kayaks when they person tires out? Perhaps a small solar panel could help with range? they do make small ones.